Jump to content

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 26/07/21 in all areas

  1. TomCFC85

    Erling Haaland

    To be fair, most of that Sandro thread was me.
    6 points
  2. 5 points
  3. thebluekid

    Erling Haaland

    Is a Sancho replacement so has zero outcome on the Haaland transfer. Unbelievable signing for them and will work well with Haaland. Their new manager employs a 2 striker system so will be interesting to see how they link up!
    4 points
  4. Holte End 96 great support that day.
    4 points
  5. Mod Stark

    15 years!

    I had totally missed the date, July 16th 2006, 15 years of this forum. A few other guise before that, but yea, 15 years of The Shed End Forum. Nice one everyone old and new 👍
    3 points
  6. coco

    Erling Haaland

    Just get on with your life until the season starts again. learnt that lesson when we signed Robinho.
    3 points
  7. Sindre

    Random Rumours

    Fair play to United. Two weak areas they had to adress and they've gone and got two terrific players. We are falling behind here in the market.
    3 points
  8. Tuchel going to resurrect Bakayoko's career so fast it'll make Lazarus blush.
    3 points
  9. TomCFC85

    Tiémoué Bakayoko

    Hey guys, just an update for you all. The reason I haven't been as active recently is because I've been working behind the scenes at Chelsea under a new role. I can now officially announce that I've been officially promoted to the role of Personal Ultimate Bakayoko Executive. What this role entails is preparing Bakayoko for his role as the next Declan Rice, in fact, better than Declan Rice. Petr Cech himself said that I will be in charge of all Bakayoko propaganda from today onwards. To start, I will tell you some Bakayoko facts that will increase his value and standing with fans: Bakayoko has more Serie A Goals than Alan Shearer and Lionel Messi COMBINED. One day a child came up to Bakayoko and asked: "Will I be as good of a football as you one day?" Bakayoko calmed replied "Of course, young one. Eat your vegetables and work hard" That child grew up to be Alex Sandro. Bakayoko also plugged a HDMI cable into his TV first try. Bakayoko once kicked a ball into space, that ball is now Venus. Anyway, I hope you guys have a lovely day. Love Tom
    3 points
  10. Mod Stark

    Eden Hazard

    Nobody can blame him though really, Burgers are quite nice.
    3 points
  11. 2 points
  12. Boyne

    Pre Season Competition

    For those going to the game against Spurs on 4 August. Shame that I won't be there as am busy elsewhere. Will be nice to show the CL trophy to the Spuds! https://www.chelseafc.com/en/news/2021/07/26/champions-league-trophy-parade-and-more-at-mind-series?cardIndex=0-5
    2 points
  13. Adamrb

    Random Rumours

    Apparently he’s rubbish now according to some on here. I think he’s a great signing. utd mean business this summer. I’d have loved either sancho or varane here as I’ve said previously. Fingers crossed ole f**ks it all up!
    2 points
  14. enigma

    Erling Haaland

    I'd rather us spend the extra and get Haaland than sign Lukaku.
    2 points
  15. Think he really will have a top season of he stays injury free. Though I think Timo is our best passer. The way he passes up easy goals takes some doing 😉
    2 points
  16. goose

    15 years!

    No staying power, the old pricks.🤣 Well done to all the mods and contributors who have kept it going since CSR days. Great dedication and effort.
    2 points
  17. DarkMata

    Erling Haaland

    So Dortmund will now reject our first bid, and wait patiently for the £20 million add ons to be included. Roman won’t be happy, Mr leaker will be swimming with the fish’s tonight
    2 points
  18. Escape to Victory: The Ipswich footballers who made a cult classic. www.bbc.co.uk By Richard Haugh BBC News, East IMAGE COPYRIGHTALAMY image caption"There was Kazimierz Deyna, Ardiles, Co Prins and everyone else," says Russell Osman. "Crikey, there's some terrific international players here" Forty years ago the worlds of film and football collided, as superstars including Sylvester Stallone and Michael Caine joined forces with some of the world's best players to tell the story of how a group of prisoners of war took on their Nazi captors. Escape to Victory pulled together an enviable team made up of stars including World Cup winners Pele, Bobby Moore and Osvaldo Ardiles - and several players from Ipswich Town. Fans of the Suffolk club, currently in the third tier of English football, take pride in their involvement and see it as something to be celebrated, along with the silverware they won several decades ago. But what do the players remember of the experience? 'Out of our comfort zone' Ipswich Town were a force to be reckoned with in the early 1980s. They had won the FA Cup in 1978 and continued to improve, under the guidance of Sir Bobby Robson. Two months before Escape to Victory's US release on 31 July 1981, they had lifted the Uefa Cup before narrowly missing out on the domestic league title. "Bobby Robson called a meeting in the changing room one day and mentioned to the lads if anybody wasn't doing anything in the summer and wanted to go and help in the making of this film we were free to do so," says former Ipswich and England defender Russell Osman. "I was single at the time, hadn't got anything arranged or booked, so I said 'Yeah, fine'." IMAGE COPYRIGHTALAMY image captionLaurie Sivell says Pele was an incredible talent and "a lovely man" who "would be doing keepy-ups while giving interviews" Filming took place in Budapest during summer 1980, and Osman's teammates John Wark, Kevin Beattie, Laurie Sivell, Kevin O'Callaghan, Robin Turner and Paul Cooper also agreed to take part. "As far as we knew then it was just a case of going out there and filming some background shots of people playing football, while the rest of the film was being shot," Osman continues. "It wasn't until we got there that we realised it was a bit more involved than that. "When we first got out there they gave me a script and said, 'The character you're playing is Doug Clure.' "The next morning I was face-to-face with Michael Caine, doing the dialogue that's in the film." IMAGE COPYRIGHTGETTY IMAGES image captionJohn Wark says it was fun to share stories with the likes of Michael Caine and Bobby Moore every evening during filming The plot of Escape to Victory, or Victory as it was called in the US, is driven by Caine's character, Colby, and his desire to arrange a football match between his fellow prisoners of war and a German team. When the Germans finally agree to host the game in a full stadium in Paris, the Allied prisoners see a perfect opportunity to escape. While fictional, the story is partly inspired by FC Start, a wartime Kiev side that took on and beat their Nazi occupiers. Osman says Caine helped the footballers transition into temporary film stars. "We were all really out of our comfort zone, being in a position that we'd never been in before," he says. "I remember sitting in the hut in the prisoner of war camp where my first scene was going to be shot and Michael Caine walked in, and for about half an hour he just told stories and made everybody laugh. "Then all of a sudden it was a case of 'Ok, let's get this in the can, Russell'.... bang, bang, bang and before you knew it we were doing it and it was done. "He was very, very good - a proper gentleman, a proper bloke." IMAGE COPYRIGHTSHUTTERSTOCK image captionOsman (to the left of Sylvester Stallone) was given a key line in the film as the players decide not to escape at half-time The Ipswich players have been less forthcoming in their praise for Stallone, who had already made the first two Rocky films and was a major star. Beattie, who died in 2018, wrote about his time on the film in his 1998 autobiography, and his joy at winning $100 from Stallone by beating him at arm-wrestling. Former Scotland international Wark, who played midfielder Arthur Hayes in the film, laughs at the memory. "The Beat took him on and did him easy, as usual," says Wark. "One take, bump, he was straight down. "You wouldn't take The Beat on - he would beat anybody." You might also like: The fast life of Dalian Atkinson 'This day belongs to one team only' Ed Sheeran to sponsor Ipswich Town's shirts Stallone's character, Robert Hatch, spends much of the film trying to convince Colby that he should be part of the Allied team, but these pleas fall on deaf ears until it becomes clear that he is a pivotal part of the planned escape. And so the unfancied American joins the team, at the expense of O'Callaghan's character, who has to have his arm broken to make the switch seem plausible. Wark says being a goalkeeper didn't come naturally to Stallone. "When he was a goalkeeper he said to the director 'Can I score the winning goal?', and we'd say 'You're the goalkeeper!'. "In the end they make him a hero by saving a penalty, but when we were doing rehearsals it took him about six takes before he could even get near one. "We'd be chipping balls in and he was meant to save them, but he didn't know what to do." IMAGE COPYRIGHTALAMY image captionStallone and Pele lined up in the same team in the film Sivell, a goalkeeper with Ipswich, offered Stallone some help. "I gave him a lesson at one point," he says. "He'd pick the ball up and bounce it around like a basketball player - I expected him to try and dunk it in the goal." Wark describes the filming as being the "best five weeks" of his life, and talks fondly of nightly "drinks and meals with superstars". He, too, had some lines of dialogue, but was in for a surprise when the time came to watch Escape to Victory in the cinema. "I was at the premiere at the Gaumont in Ipswich with a few of the players - those who were in it and others," the Glaswegian says. "I was sitting beside Alan Brazil and Eric Gates and I go to them 'Right lads, this is me, I'm going to be speaking my two lines.' "I walk in and bloody hell, that's not my voice - that's an Edinburgh accent! They were laughing their heads off. "Even now some people don't understand me. It was embarrassing, but I thought it was quite funny." Wark's discovery that his voice had been dubbed was not the only disappointment for the Ipswich players. Sivell says he was initially meant to have the goalkeeper role played by O'Callaghan, a winger for Ipswich, but "my voice was very gruff back then". "So I was relegated to the German goalkeeper," he says. "I had blonde hair back then so I probably fitted in with the Aryan look they were going for." IMAGE COPYRIGHTGETTY IMAGES image captionOscar-winner John Huston was credited with trusting the footballers to dictate the on-field action As with the footballing and acting talent, Escape to Victory had an A-lister for a director. John Huston won the best director Oscar in 1949 for The Treasure of the Sierra Madre and other career highlights include The African Queen, The Maltese Falcon and Annie. Osman, Wark and Sivell all credit Huston with making a film that portrays a realistic football match, something that other movies have struggled to achieve. But Osman remembers a dispute as to how the "soccer" match would be filmed, with the cast of international players finally having an influence on proceedings. "I think Bobby Moore, Mike Summerbee, Pele and Werner Roth had a meeting with John Huston and basically said 'We'll tell you what to do and how to do it, you just make sure you've got the cameras there'," he says. IMAGE COPYRIGHTALAMY image caption"It's not a bad team", says John Wark (back row, third from right). "I think we'd struggle if we kept Stallone in goal." Locals were invited to attend the match and were then shuffled around the ground at various points to give the impression the stadium was full. As the film reaches its climax, the action cuts between the match and scenes from beneath the stadium, where a tunnel is being dug so the players can escape at half-time. The Allies walk off the field demoralised by a 4-1 drubbing in the first 45 minutes, but their spirits are lifted as they see their rescuers break through the bottom of a shared bath. As the players head towards the tunnel - and freedom - it is Osman's character who speaks up. "I don't want to go back - we can win this," he says, galvanising the Allies, who decide to return to the pitch rather than making a run for it. "I had a few nice lines in it," says Osman. "That was a bonus for me amongst everything else - apart from just the playing, my lines weren't doctored or cut or anything." They think it's all over... The second half sees the Allies take the initiative and fight back to just a one-goal deficit. And then, in a moment that will go on to define the rest of his life, Osman pounces on the ball as it rebounds off a post and taps home to seal a famous 4-4 draw. Well, almost. "It was unbelievable," says Osman. "The ball comes back off the post and I'm given offside. "It would have been nice to have been credited with the goal, as I didn't score than many from centre half, but it's just one of those things." Instead, it's Pele who grabs the leveller, with an overhead kick that is so good viewers get to watch it several times in slow motion. Even the German officers get on their feet to applaud his athleticism. "We did it a few times until we could get it right," says Sivell, who also gets the slow-motion treatment from what was a high-tech piece of equipment back then, as he dives to try and stop the ball from going in. In a reference to a breakfast cereal advert - in which a 'keeper trips and falls on his face as he tries to save a shot - he says: "I tried to save it.It had it wouldn't have looked very good if I did a Weetabix dive to let it in. It had to look realistic.IMAGE COPYRIGHTRUSSELL OSMAN image captionRussell Osman, pictured wearing a T-shirt marking the 40thl anniversary and in front of a photo signed by Pele, still has souvenirs from the film Escape to Victory remains a regular fixture on TV, and normally coincides with increased activity on Wark's phone. "To this day I get calls from friends and family saying 'You're on the telly again', and I'm like 'What is it, Crimewatch?' he says. "The amount of times people come up to me in Tesco or Asda and say that I was in it - I have to remind them about my football career. "I'm just proud to have been in it. It's good for Ipswich because they had so many players in this famous movie, and it's good for Ipswich, the town itself." It has previously been reported that the Ipswich players received £6,000 each for their work on the film. Sivell says he can't remember the exact figure but "we all knew it was much less than everyone else was getting". Both he and Wark can remember a group of players raising the issue with producer Freddie Fields, in the hope of getting a bigger slice of the pie. "I went up to his hotel room," recalls Wark. "Speaking on behalf of Ipswich Town, I said 'I think we should get more money or royalties or we're seriously thinking of leaving.' His request was turned down. "I had to go back to the lads and say 'We're staying.' But imagine if we'd got royalties." 'It's nice it became an iconic movie' After filming was completed Wark kept hold of his Allied shirt and "shorts that went down to the knees", but later gave them to charity. Sivell still has his German goalkeeper shirt tucked safely away, along with a signed script. Osman, meanwhile, has an enviable collection including the Allied kit, boots, a signed ball and a director's chair. "It's nice to have something that you can hang on to," he says. "And it's nice that the film has turned into a bit of an iconic movie. "In a way it fills a nice part of that era - the side I played with between 1980 and 1982. "We won the Uefa Cup, came runners-up in the league two years running and did Escape to Victory - a hell of a lot crammed into this three-year period. "I look back and I think 'what a good decision I made to go out and do it'."
    1 point
  19. Gol15

    15 years!

    2006??? Pff, other clubs have had their online forums since 1901, typical for us to enjoy success in our life time and not like those old vampires out there...
    1 point
  20. Amputechture

    Random Rumours

    Hasn't been 48 hours yet. Be patient😉
    1 point
  21. Valerie

    Erling Haaland

    Grab a yoga mat. Take some deep breaths, you know, using that in through the nose, out through the mouth stuff. Then grab the yogamat and tear it to pieces with your teeth, and growl at anybody approaching you. It won't solve anything, but at least there's one less f**king yogamat in the world.
    1 point
  22. It’s good experience though - he’s been working behind the scenes at a big club which would have given him a lot of insight.
    1 point
  23. It’s one of my favourites Anyway here’s a Colin Hay song that I’ve had stuck in my head for weeks…
    1 point
  24. FIFA who in effect are the controlling authority when it comes to players and their contracts simply won’t allow clubs to unilaterally end a players contract You can sack a player for gross mis conduct but even then the sacking would be subject to appeal. In effect if a club signs a 3 year contract with a player the club can’t move him on unless a contract is cancelled by mutual consent or a transfer agreed. When it comes to a player they can leave before a contract ends if they fall within the criteria of either a Webster or in certain circumstances they can apply to have their contract cancelled if they haven’t featured in 10% of first team games but each application is looked on by a case by case basis . There are defined timings that players have to adhere to normally within 15 days of a clubs last comoetive game of a season
    1 point
  25. £102m for an almost 30 years old striker is a lot. Lewandowski ist just 32 years old. So my plan B would be Lewandowski and not Lukaku.
    1 point
  26. No, don't really want to go down the club legend route again (if Terry returns it would likely be a grooming to an eventual manager shot which won't be good for either party). It's too painful when things go south not only cause a legend suffers but also all legions of excuses start getting rolled out as seen with Jose mark 2 and Lamps.
    1 point
  27. CFCCAN

    Erling Haaland

    In days past Lukaku's historic thread of 129 pages, Stones 106, Pogba 100 and even Sandro with over 60...Haaland has a long, long way to go yet...we could be back here in January; if the pen is mightier than the sword then Roman needs to sign the cheque before I fall asleep...
    1 point
  28. 1 point
  29. Rumour has it, he’s seen Real Madrid’s glorious victory over Rangers today, 2-1 I heard; he’s already on the plane to Spain to go and buddy up with Perez… Oh wait… Oh they lost and are actually a sh*t show of a club.
    1 point
  30. Argo

    Eden Hazard

    We already have about 7 players for 3 positions more if we get Haaland and all for their faults are better than present day Hazard. Emotion aside there's just no room for him.
    1 point
  31. mojo

    Official Thomas Tuchel

    ‘I accept the award very gratefully as a great honour for the entire team because I see myself as a team player,’ said Tuchel on receiving the award. ‘I don’t believe in individual awards too much, I truly believe it is a team effort, not only the players on the pitch everybody loves, but the team behind the team. I don’t do this alone. I do it with my staff, not only my German and Hungarian staff but all the people at Cobham. It’s incredible to be part of because there we have an incredible amount of quality and support. ‘Football teams can win without the coaches, but coaches cannot win without the team. It’s a reward for the team and what we did, and now let’s get on.’
    1 point
  32. 1 point
  33. Brigadeiro

    Erling Haaland

    New content! I'll go right away on twitter to post "I'm told Roman isn't happy with Mr. Leaker so he'll send him on an underseas trip. If it's not a trip then I'm told Mr Leaker will become fish food." Seriously, those damn "insiders" should just shut the f*** up and come here instead start a thread cause they seem to know f*** all like ourselves.
    1 point
  34. Munkworth

    Erling Haaland

    Ironic seeing this thread now that it was threads going off topic that was his undoing
    1 point
  35. He's better than Pulisic. We're fools if we're even entertaining the idea of selling him.
    1 point
  36. dansubrosa

    Erling Haaland

    Down the corridor, first door on the left
    1 point
  37. TheGreatestGame

    Next new Striker

    I would take 3 years of Lewandowski for $40 million and flip Tammy to the highest bidder. Then go after Carnavinga who is the box to box midfielder the club needs.
    1 point
  38. King Kerry scoring v Spuds in 1985/86. Probably been posted. That I fully accept!
    1 point
  39. Happy Birthday to this guy. 60 years old today ! He’s been mentioned ‘a few times’ on this thread…😀
    1 point
  40. Myles has gone in a deal similar to Bate's, just waiting on Tino to complete his move too.
    1 point
  41. 1 point
  42. erskblue

    Forgotten great players

    Gabriel Batistuta Best Goals.
    1 point
  43. erskblue

    Forgotten great players

    Gabriel Batistuta. Sometimes watching football leaves an indelible mark on a young boy’s imagination. In 1999, I was seven years old and my obsession with Manchester United was reaching new heights after watching them win the Champions League in the most dramatic of circumstances. That night, when I should have been readying myself for school the following morning, I descended on my front garden and re-enacted Ole Gunnar Solskjær’sfamous last-gasp strike with my trusty Mitre ball and a set of nets that were horribly mangled from sustaining shot after shot from my uneducated right foot. In similar vein, what I witnessed a little less than a year later in March 2000 roused that same self-belief that I could recreate another display of a footballing master class: Gabriel Batistuta, centre stage in the Theatre of Dreams. I knew nothing of this player as I had zero exposure to Italian football at that formative stage in my life. The Argentine goal machine picks up the ball well over thirty yards out; no danger one would presume. Not with Batistuta on the ball. The hair-banded predator effortlessly eludes the challenge of Jaap Stam – who was far from Titus Bramble back then – before unleashing the most jaw-dropping missile of a shot I had ever witnessed, screeching through the air and fizzing past a helpless Raymond van der Gouw. Old Trafford was silenced by a rocket. I was staggered by this extraordinary goal. I had never seen a professional footballer rip into a piece of leather quite like the way Batistuta did that night. The power and precision he generated was unprecedented in my eyes. Unsurprisingly, I had become comfortably accustomed to David Beckham’s faultless foot-wrapping free-kick strikes. Granted, Beckham’s portfolio of set-piece goals is a thing of beauty, but there was just something about the way the ball was dispatched from Batistuta’s boot that got to me. I proceeded to set three footballs side-by-side in my front garden and batter them with all my might in the hope that I would look up and see the ball scream into the roof of the net in a fashion not dissimilar to the Argentine’s. What resulted was a few angry neighbours and appallingly dented garage door. What a fool I was to believe that I could emulate the brilliance of Batistuta. Through his exploits at Newell’s Old Boys, Boca Juniors, Fiorentina and then Roma, Batistuta had developed the most insatiable appetite for goals imaginable and his education at those clubs cultivated a technique of striking the football so efficient in appeasing that appetite. Batistuta’s footballing odyssey began in Rosario, Argentina’s third city, with Newell’s. Batistuta had been spotted by Jorge Griffa, Newell’s youth team manager at that time, who persuaded the young protégé to leave home for the first time in his life and pursue a career in professional football. Batistuta was initially apprehensive due to his commitment to family and education but agreed after the club agreed to pay for his education in Rosario. The youngster impressed instantly in one of Argentina’s finest youth academies and soon broke into the first team, where he made his debut in 1988 and played in the Copa Libertadores final. Batistuta’s proficiency inside the penalty box struck fear into Newell’s rivals. He became known as ‘The Animal’ due to his strength and tenacity in breaking free from defenders, finding space and dispatching goals in clinical style. Newell’s’ supporters adored his hard work and determination. Fans of football always love a fighter, a player with great heart, and Batistuta fit the bill perfectly in these regards. His education finished and he struggled to find work so in order to continue playing for Newell’s Batistuta cut the grass on the pitch, cleaned windows and picked up rubbish in the stands for enough to get by. Money did not matter to him. He was prepared to earn just about enough so he could continue playing football. With his stock rising rapidly, Batistuta made the difficult decision to move to River Plate. What made it difficult was the fact that he was a lifelong supporter of Plate’s arch-nemesis, Boca Juniors. What Batistuta wanted more than anything though was to score goals and he saw River as the best place for him to achieve that. However, Daniel Passarella, the heroic captain of Argentina’s 1978 World Cup-winning team, did not see great potential in Batistuta and opted to omit him from regular first-team football. Batistuta, hurt and surprised, did not let this deter him. He harnessed the pain from watching on as his River colleagues played without him and used it to make him mentally tougher. He began to train harder, focus on his strengths and hone his skills to become the ultimate goalscorer. The results very much speak for themselves. Having grown weary of Passarella’s ignorance at Plate, Batistuta crossed town to his boyhood idols Boca. He was initially played out of position by Osvaldo Potente but Óscar Tabárez arrived to replace him and immediately recognised Batistuta as the ultimate focal point of attack. He moved him to centre-forward and Batistuta repaid the favour with goals aplenty. He enraptured the vociferous Boca fans and forged a wonderfully productive partnership with Boca’s chief conductor, Diego Latorre. Batistuta holds his time with Boca close to his heart; he genuinely connected with the fans. For him, that was what professional football was all about; exciting fans, feeling adored and being part of a team that would be remembered in years to come. Major honours and trophies proved hard to come by in Buenos Aires – it would become a recurring motif of his storied career – but Batistuta was fulfilled by the sense that his play excited the fans regardless of where they finished. It was the eye-catching displays at Boca that got Europe talking. Tabárez became increasingly aware of the European clubs circling Batistuta and was resigned to losing his most lethal weapon. Batistuta was eager for a fresh challenge and an opportunity to introduce the world to the phenomenon of ‘Batigol’. He provided potential suitors with an unforgettable audition during the 1991 Copa América for Argentina, when he finished as the tournament’s top-scorer with six strikes. His goals and performances prompted Fiorentina to move for him and the rest is history. That year, fans in Florence fell in love with Batistuta and adores him to this day. Batistuta determinedly overcame the difficulty in adapting to a different culture and style of football in Italy, and began showing teams in Serie A why Fiorentina placed their belief in him. He scored 14 goals in his first season and 19 the following campaign. However, his second year was overshadowed by troubles at La Viola and they were relegated to Serie B. The fans at the Artemio Franchi stadium panicked at the thought of losing their star player and favourite son. They had adopted Batistuta as one of their own and feared that the advances of European superpowers AC Milan and Real Madrid would prove irresistible to him. He was having none of it. Batistuta, characteristically disregarding the allure of money and prestige attached to a move to a major club, decided to stay in Florence and help his adopted club fight back to Serie A. His 16 goals in Serie B helped Fiorentina back to the high table in Italian football and endeared the Argentine even deeper into the hearts of the fans. In modern football, it is too easy for a talented player standing out in a struggling team to flee when trouble strikes, but not for Batistuta. He has since said that he could have easily moved to Real Madrid or Manchester United but he never had any interest in leaving Fiorentina for either of them. For him, the challenge of improving an underachieving Fiorentina was more attractive than jumping on the express train of one of Europe’s big clubs collecting trophies effortlessly. This was the truest expression of Batistuta’s approach to football; he was always willing to fight, always willing to work hard to earn a reputation and relationship with the fans. He went on to cement his place as arguably Fiorentina’s greatest ever player, certainly their greatest goalscorer. He amassed over 200 goals during his nine years clad in purple before finally ending his adventure with Fiorentina in favour of a fresh challenge in another hallowed Italian city. In the capital with Roma, Batistuta finally won the Scudetto that had eluded him and forged a devastating partnership with club legend Francesco Totti. Becoming a champion of Italy with Roma was a historic moment for both the club and the player. Roma had finally returned to the top after an 18-year barren spell and Batistuta was able to call himself a champion. He knew that although he had left Fiorentina and won the trophy they could never manage with Roma, he was still adored by the Florence faithful. There were no cries of Judas and no vendetta. Fiorentina knew they had kept the player as long as they could and they were forever grateful for his service, regardless of what he did following his departure. Perhaps the saddest mark on an illustrious time in football for Batistuta is the World Cup. He represented his country at three finals’ and played well in all of them. He remains to this day the only player to score a hat-trick in two different World Cups – a beautiful distinction to have. Goals and recognition were juxtaposed with a narrative of heartache for Batistuta in the World Cup, though, as Argentina never came close to winning it during his time in the squad. In 1994, Batistuta and Argentina started their campaign brilliantly with a 4-0 destruction of Greece. Batistuta claimed a hat-trick in his first-ever World Cup match but that elation quickly faded with the events that followed. Argentina’s ’94 journey will forever be remembered for Diego Maradona’sexpulsion from the tournament after testing positive for ephedrine. In the aftermath of that shattering story, Argentina failed to carry on without him and were eliminated at the hands of Romania. Batistuta refused to use Maradona’s discrepancy as an excuse for their poor performance and was determined to make up for it in his next World Cup. It wasn’t to be, however, for one of Argentina’s most gifted marksmen as they were bettered by a memorable Dennis Bergkamp strike in the quarter-finals in France 1998 and Batistuta was again left in dismay. Things got even worse in Batistuta’s swansong in 2002 as they were beaten by England and failed to see off Sweden as they tumbled out of Korea and Japan in the group stage. At the end of the Sweden match, Batistuta broke down in tears. He knew he would never play in the World Cup again. Players often cry when they are sent packing from the World Cup but I remember feeling the pain of Batistuta, having become a fond admirer of him since that wonder goal at Old Trafford. Here was a man whose passion and emotion poured out of him relentlessly. I can’t help at this moment feel as if Batistuta didn’t get back from the game what he gave. He always exuded the fervour that every top-flight professional footballer should. In his later years, Batistuta wound down his career in Qatar, scoring goals for fun in a lesser league. After an ill-fated spell with Internazionale, he knew his time at the highest level had come to an end. His move to Qatar was not just motivated by money, though. Batistuta was always acutely aware of his limitations and he felt it necessary to bow out gracefully from Italian football and introduce his family to a different culture. Revelations about his plea to doctors to amputate his legs suggest that Batistuta played through the pain barrier for much of his career but I thank him sincerely for doing so for the memories he bestowed upon me and for staying a truly respectable footballer for his entire career. www.these football times.co By Matt Gault @MattGault11
    1 point
  44. One of the cool clips, soon enough for the vintage topics lol...Look how TJ and Hazard are so good here, the captain saying yea yea but listen we'll see next year and boom next year we won the title!
    1 point
  45. We have been absolutely robbed of Terry Henry or John Thierry.
    1 point
×
×
  • Create New...

Well, this is awkward!

awkward the office GIF

The Shed End Forum relies on revenue to pay for hosting and upgrades. While we try to keep adverts as unobtrusive as possible without pop ups, we need to run ad's to make sure we can stay online and continue to keep the forum up, as over the years costs have become very high.

Could you please allow adverts on this domain by switching it off. Some of the advert banners can actually be closed to avoid interferance of your experience on The Shed End.

Cheers now!

emma watson yes GIF

Alright already, It's off!