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Moosie dear, you do know that Pride and  Prejudice is a 19th century novel by Jane Austen, don't you?  I don;t like Jane Austen's novels much and I don't like the films made from them much.  Are you sure it's not Colin Firth that you think is to die for?

 

If course I know it's a novel by Jane Austen. I even own a copy and have read it. Did it after I saw the 1995 version of it. Also liked the one from a few years ago.

As for Colin Firth, I think he's brilliant in every way.

 

I've now got the urge to watch the movie again.

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Zero Dark Thirty.

 

What a great film this was, one of the best I've seen in awhile and im happy I didnt rely on most of the movie critics regarding this movie - must be so boring sitting there looking for plot holes and sh*t, I watch movies for entertainment and this one certainly had me entertained throughout the whole story!

 

Watch it whenever you get the chance, thank me later.

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I watched 'Flight' a few nights ago, it was ok. Denzel Washington plays an alcoholic pilot who emergency lands a dodgy plane and then has to deal with the consequences of his drinking etc.

 

Great first hour, then it tapered off a bit and the ending was a bit 'meh'

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I'm going to see Lincoln tomorrow afternoon!  Looking forward to that.  I'll let you know if it lived up to my expectations.

I enjoyed it very much, Moi, hope you do too. 

 

Recently watched Django Unchained and that was amazing as well - I'm also studying this particular period in history right now haha! 

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Watched "Schindler's List" for the first time this afternoon. Must say, I was pretty disappointed after all I've heard and read about it, maybe it's because I don't like Liam Neeson.

I thought it was pretty decent when I saw it. It's been about 20 years since I saw it, though.

 

People say it's a must see movie for everyone, so that "we never forget". For such a purpose, I'd say "Night and Fog" is a better choice. As the running time is about 30 minutes, it's short enough so no one can use the excuse that it's too long. Don't let the short running time fool you, though. It doesn't pull any punches, so for some it could be too much to watch, so I warn you so you know what you're stepping into, but I still recommend that you watch it. Slow down, take the time and really watch it. It can be found on youtube in decent quality and with English subtitles.

 

From must see to must read... I think Maus is a very good graphic novel on the subject of Holocaust. If you see the book and have the time to read it, I'm sure it will be worth your time.

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I think the '1' to see so that we never forget is 'The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas' first it shows the idiocy of Nazi idealism & second what happens when everyone turns a blind eye!

I'd still go for Night and Fog. It manages to make a bigger impact in 30 minutes than any of the feature length dramas I've seen on the subject.

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Got to be honest, a decent documentary on the subject is far more powerful than a movie, however well intentioned. I became disillusioned with movies based on historical events many years ago, mainly due to the ridiculous historical inaccuracies and 'artistic license' used in so many of them.

 

Thanks anyway, Maks, I shall keep a look out for 'Night And Fog'!

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I finally got round to  watching Night and Fog tonight.  A simply brilliant film whose painstakingly beautiful commentary showed such restraint.

 

I know a lot about the Holocaust, have read Primo Levi's books about it, have visited Sachsenhausen, a concentration camp not far from Berlin, and have seen all the good fictional films about concentration camps. like The Boy in the Striped pyjamas, Escape From Sobibor, the Round Up, but Night and Fog is totally different.

 

Right from the beginning, when the narrator  points out that the construction of death camps was the same as the construction of any other public building - contractors put in bids, civil servants met to consider the plans, bribes were no doubt offered - you are conscious of the coldly scientific nature of the planning that went in to ridding Europe of the Jewish people.

 

I have never seen such intimate footage of the inmates as is shown here.  If anyone anywhere has any doubt that the Holocaust did indeed happen, they should watch this. 

 

 

There was a film made for television a few years ago, Maksimov called "God On Trial" - if you haven;t seen it, I can send you a copy of it.  It is about a dormitory of Jewish prisoners waiting for death in Auschwitz,  who decide that God had abandoned them, and they put him on trial.  It is excellent, but not in the  same class as Night and Fog.

 

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1173494/?ref_=sr_1

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Whilst nearly everyone knows about the Nazi holocaust, very little is mentioned about the millions of Jews murdered by the Russians under Stalin. Call me a cynic, but could this possibly be because the Russians were on our side in WW2?

 

Millions of Native Americans were murdered in an earlier holocaust by US forces in the 19th century, though that hardly ever gets mentioned either. The vast majority of surviving Native Americans live in abject poverty on reservations to this day, large numbers of them suffering from disease, severe depression and alcoholism due to lack of work and support. Suicides among these people is extortionately high, yet very little is done to help them. I get so angry when I hear Americans bleating on about the Jewish holocaust, their ancestors were doing exactly the same thing as Hitler less than 100 years earlier.

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Whilst nearly everyone knows about the Nazi holocaust, very little is mentioned about the millions of Jews murdered by the Russians under Stalin. Call me a cynic, but could this possibly be because the Russians were on our side in WW2?

 

Millions of Native Americans were murdered in an earlier holocaust by US forces in the 19th century, though that hardly ever gets mentioned either. The vast majority of surviving Native Americans live in abject poverty on reservations to this day, large numbers of them suffering from disease, severe depression and alcoholism due to lack of work and support. Suicides among these people is extortionately high, yet very little is done to help them. I get so angry when I hear Americans bleating on about the Jewish holocaust, their ancestors were doing exactly the same thing as Hitler less than 100 years earlier.

History is written by the winners. Allied leaders would have been trialled for war crimes if they had lost. Americans bang on about illegal immigrants coming into the country... And so on.

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Whilst nearly everyone knows about the Nazi holocaust, very little is mentioned about the millions of Jews murdered by the Russians under Stalin. Call me a cynic, but could this possibly be because the Russians were on our side in WW2?

 

Millions of Native Americans were murdered in an earlier holocaust by US forces in the 19th century, though that hardly ever gets mentioned either. The vast majority of surviving Native Americans live in abject poverty on reservations to this day, large numbers of them suffering from disease, severe depression and alcoholism due to lack of work and support. Suicides among these people is extortionately high, yet very little is done to help them. I get so angry when I hear Americans bleating on about the Jewish holocaust, their ancestors were doing exactly the same thing as Hitler less than 100 years earlier.

 

There are a lot of problems with the way the Holocaust is treated these days. It's no longer a genocide, it's the genocide. Mao's Great Leap Forward, the purges and pogroms under Stalin, Leopold of Belgium's exploitation of the Congo - these are all genocides from the 20th century that had higher death tolls than the Holocaust, much higher in the case of the first two and yet all three combined receive a small fraction of the attention of the Holocaust. Another thing that really bothers me is the way it's popularly regarded as being a Jewish genocide, when in reality Jews were but one group systematically targeted for extinction by Hitler. Around 6 million Jews died, but that only represents half of the death toll. Slavs, Romani, homosexuals, Germans of African descent (i.e. Rhineland bar stewards), the disabled, various religious groups such as Jehovah's Witnesses, etc.

 

As for the Russians being on our side, that's definitely it. Hell, the Americans proved that war crimes were only criminal acts when the offending party has nothing to offer them. So many German officers prosecuted, some of them unfairly so (e.g. Joachim Peiper), and yet the Japanese escaped all prosecution for their heinous acts because good ol' Uncle Sam needed the research they obtained from torturing Chinese captives. The story of Unit 731 is one of the most sickening of WW2, which is really saying something.

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Glad to see another Alain Resnais fan. I have to agree this short yet unequivocally powerful film resonates clearly the grotesque reality of the Holocaust. Based on this film, I would recommend everyone: Elem Klimov's Come and See, the greatest (anti) war film I've seen (a subjective opinion, but still once you see it, hopefully you'll arrive at the same conclusion), here's a short description: 'A boy is unwillingly thrust into the atrocities of war in WWII Byelorussia, fighting for a hopelessly unequipped resistance movement against the ruthless German forces. Witnessing scenes of abject terror and accidentally surviving horrifying situations he loses his innocence and then his mind.' - Imdb

 

Anyway, the last film I've watched was Bergman's The Passion of Anna - a great meta-film, his first 'proper' colour film - experimenting with nuances, form and ultimately the narrative (for example, interviews of the actors talking about their characters are carefully intercut into the film). The ending has to be one of my favourites so far.

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The Spy Who Came In From The Cold (1965)

brilliant. ones of the best films i have seen in a while. could be described as an anti-bond film, very unglamorous of the whole spy genre, little action and lots of dialogue.

in fact i found it very hard to keep up with the dialogue as there was so much of it that you really had to rack your brain to piece it all together and keep with the trail it was setting in front of you

the recent Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy was heavey dialogue aswell, but i found that confusing for confusing sakes just to try and add credibility to its intellect. didnt like that movie at all

anyway, this film i would give 10/10

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  • 4 weeks later...

I've just watched Barry Lyndon for the first time, very enjoyable.

 

Some have pilloried it for being too long, and too languid, but what do they expect from an epic based on a Makepeace Thackeray novel?

 

A visual tour-de-force, simply beautiful.

 

Ryan O'Neal's portrayal of Redmond Barry wasn't spectacular by any means, but serviceable.

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Bluebeard's remark above about historical inaccuracies reminded me of the outrage I felt a couple of weeks ago when I went to see a film  called A Royal Weekend.

 

It was about a weekend visit paid by George VI and Queen Elizabeth to Roosevelt in 1939 just before the war.

 

I shall pass over the portrayal of the British royal couple, who were there to try to persuade Roosevelt that America should join Britain in opposing Hitler.

 

What incensed me was that at the end of the film a large announcement was made on the screen in writing.  It said:

 

 

In 1942 Roosevelt kept his promise to King George, and America entered the war.

 

NO you twats - America entered the war in December 1941 when the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbour.  Nothing to do with King George!

 

How can they get away with mistakes like that?

 

However Bill Murray's portrayal of Roosevelt was excellent.

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David Fincher's version of Girl with the dragon tattoo.

 

Having already watched the original I can't say there are too many differences between the two versions.

 

Just strikes me as trying to cash in whilst the books were popular.

 

Noomi Rapace was a much better Lisbeth also. 

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