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38 minutes ago, erskblue said:

On this day in 1948 we played Blackpool at The Bridge in front of 77,696. Some crowd.  A 3- 3 draw.

Both sides finished mid table that season. Blackpool did have the great Stanley Matthews their side.

77k crowd for a mid table game, surely not, we only got crowds from 2003! “Where were we when we were sh*t”

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Not just their first title but their first major success came for Chelsea in 1955.
 It was former Arsenal and England centre-forward Ted Drake who, after becoming manager in 1952 , transformed the club via an improved youth set-up and some clever signings from the lower leagues.

Chelsea were persuaded by the FA and Football League not to enter the brand new European Cup the following year and their record throughout the rest of the 1950s remained fairly average.


They won the League Cup in 1964-65, the FA Cup in 1970 and the European Cup Winners Cup in 1971 but the club’s real success period has been under the financial auspices of Roman Abramovich, post 2003. 

From ‘soccer attic’ on our first Division 1 Title.

Programme cover for Chelsea v Blackpool, Saturday, 16th Oct 1948
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1 minute ago, erskblue said:

 I think they must have mistakenly added the 77,000...

 

 

1 minute ago, erskblue said:

 I think they must have mistakenly added the 77,000...

 

A 77,000 crowd for a midweek fixture against the donkey lashers is a great crowd since hardly no away fans will be there ,but what was the normall crowds at other grounds all across the country back in those days ? 

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18 minutes ago, ddrblue said:

 

A 77,000 crowd for a midweek fixture against the donkey lashers is a great crowd since hardly no away fans will be there ,but what was the normall crowds at other grounds all across the country back in those days ? 

Here below is an article in the Guardian from 1998. About the crowds in Football League in 1948/49.

The week before the 1948-49 English football season kicked off there was a portent: almost 31,000 turned up to watch a practice match at St James' Park between the Newcastle first team and the reserves. It was the overture to one of the most resonant of any Football League season for, by the end of it, the attendance in the League's four divisions was announced as an astonishing 41,271,414 - more than it has ever been before or since. Apart from the final at Wembley, the postwar FA Cup record was also established that winter - by the 81,565 congregation which watched non-League Yeovil Town play Manchester United in the fifth round on February 12 at Maine Road (Old Trafford was still bomb-damaged). 

Beguiling upstarts Yeovil were beaten by 8-0 and when United's manager Matt Busby afterwards apologised for the drubbing to his opposite number, Alec Stock just grinned and said in his Somerset burr, 'Don't worry, m'dear, at least we've all lived a little.' Busby then told him the immense throng had ensured Yeovil's share of the gate would be 'well over £7,000' and Stock grinned again and said that represented twice Yeovil's receipts for the previous two seasons. 

League attendances had been edging up since the end of the war - from 35,604,606 in 1946-47; 40,259,130 in 1947-48, to that peak of 1948-49 which remains the only season 41 million was reached. The totals then began to drop: by 1953-54, just over 36 million, a decade later down to 28.5 million. Even before the Taylor Report, they had dropped (in 1985-86) to 16.4 million. 

The season of 50 years ago was an almost biblical eruption of the football fans' confraternity. Recently, as celebration of Yeovil's latest Cup run, I happened upon some evocative Pathe News clips of that 81,000 Maine Road crowd of 1949 - serried monochrome banks of pinched but smiling faces under flat caps, a squashed-up multitude stretching distantly back to the raked heights of infinity through the warming fug of Woodbine smoke - and you twigged how JB Priestley was sketching from real life in The Good Companions: 'All brothers together for an hour and a half, for not only had you escaped from the clanking machinery of this lesser life, from work, wages, rent, doles, sick-pay, insurance cards, nagging wives, ailing children, bad bosses, idle workmen, but you had escaped with most of your mates and your neighbours, with half the town, and there you were, cheering together, thumping one another on the shoulders, swopping judgments like lords of the earth, having pushed your way through a turnstile into another and altogether more splendid kind of life . . .' 

Never was there a winter of such mass assemblies either before or after 1948-49. Quaintly, that season the fans were complaining about the price of football. In the two decades between the wars, admission prices had doubled, from sixpence (21/2p) to a shilling (5p) for a standing adult male. When League soccer resumed in 1946, admission had risen by half to 1s 6d. In 1948 it had been upped to 1s 9d which many considered exorbitant. They still turned up however - and how. (By the end of the Fifties, 3s was the turnstile price, a decade later 5s (25p), and by 1980 £1 (new money). By another decade, as we know, prices had really begun to get out of hand . . . 

Of course, during the half century the costs of running a League club had itself started to escalate even before the 1960 abolition of the minimum wage for players. With the crowds, transfer fees were suddenly on a corresponding upwards spiral: in 1946 the Liverpool forward Albert Stubbins carried the record, £13,000, on his balding head; by the season of 1948-49 that had been sensationally doubled, first by the £25,000 for Johnny Morris's move from Manchester United to Derby County, then Eddie Quigley's for £1,000 more from Wednesday to Preston. 

Each Saturday afternoon of that seminal season half a century ago these almost totally male multitudes were enthralled by players and teams which still summon up a vibrant resonance for those of a certain generation. With so many servicemen being demobbed around the South Coast, by 1948-49 Portsmouth had the pick of the crop and they won the first of their two successive League championships, ending a thrilling campaign five points clear of Manchester United and Derby. 

And particularly stirring hymns are still sung about two players in Hull and Nottingham: the previous season, two of the game's (still) legendary forwards had audaciously left their all-conquering First Division fields for the Third (regionally organised) Division. Hull City were in the Third (North), Notts County in the Third (South). From Sunderland, Raich Carter had at once transformed the latter and from Chelsea for a record £20,000 Tommy Lawton had arrived in Nottingham where County, gates quadrupled at a stroke, scored 76 goals in Lawton's first 25 matches (nine past Ipswich and Exeter, and 11 past Newport County). 

Eastwards, Hull and all around was also perpetually and joyously en fete throughout that 1948-49 winter. In fact, it was to take Lawton another season to win County promotion but the sleek grey fox Carter drove Hull to inevitable promotion in the northern section. 

To the table-topping match with Rotherham United on Christmas morning 1948, Boothferry Park drew the Third Division's still all-time record League attendance - 49,655. On Christmas morning! That sensational figure, however, was slaughtered just eight Saturdays later in the FA Cup, when (having disposed cruelly of Yeovil in front of that 81,000 in the fifth round) holders Man United came to Hull for the sixth on 26 February 1949, and, quite incredibly, 55,019 turned up. Still, Boothferry's record by a mile. 

On that same wintery sixth-round afternoon Derby County went south, to lose to Portsmouth. The throng of 51,385 remains Fratton Park's highest by far - and will do so for ever and ever amen. In the epic winter of 50 years ago; with its cast of millions - or 41,272,414 to be precise.

 
 

 

Edited by erskblue
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5 minutes ago, erskblue said:

Here below is an article in the Guardian from 1998. About the crowds in Football League in 1948/49.

The week before the 1948-49 English football season kicked off there was a portent: almost 31,000 turned up to watch a practice match at St James' Park between the Newcastle first team and the reserves. It was the overture to one of the most resonant of any Football League season for, by the end of it, the attendance in the League's four divisions was announced as an astonishing 41,271,414 - more than it has ever been before or since. Apart from the final at Wembley, the postwar FA Cup record was also established that winter - by the 81,565 congregation which watched non-League Yeovil Town play Manchester United in the fifth round on February 12 at Maine Road (Old Trafford was still bomb-damaged). 

Beguiling upstarts Yeovil were beaten by 8-0 and when United's manager Matt Busby afterwards apologised for the drubbing to his opposite number, Alec Stock just grinned and said in his Somerset burr, 'Don't worry, m'dear, at least we've all lived a little.' Busby then told him the immense throng had ensured Yeovil's share of the gate would be 'well over £7,000' and Stock grinned again and said that represented twice Yeovil's receipts for the previous two seasons. 

League attendances had been edging up since the end of the war - from 35,604,606 in 1946-47; 40,259,130 in 1947-48, to that peak of 1948-49 which remains the only season 41 million was reached. The totals then began to drop: by 1953-54, just over 36 million, a decade later down to 28.5 million. Even before the Taylor Report, they had dropped (in 1985-86) to 16.4 million. 

The season of 50 years ago was an almost biblical eruption of the football fans' confraternity. Recently, as celebration of Yeovil's latest Cup run, I happened upon some evocative Pathe News clips of that 81,000 Maine Road crowd of 1949 - serried monochrome banks of pinched but smiling faces under flat caps, a squashed-up multitude stretching distantly back to the raked heights of infinity through the warming fug of Woodbine smoke - and you twigged how JB Priestley was sketching from real life in The Good Companions: 'All brothers together for an hour and a half, for not only had you escaped from the clanking machinery of this lesser life, from work, wages, rent, doles, sick-pay, insurance cards, nagging wives, ailing children, bad bosses, idle workmen, but you had escaped with most of your mates and your neighbours, with half the town, and there you were, cheering together, thumping one another on the shoulders, swopping judgments like lords of the earth, having pushed your way through a turnstile into another and altogether more splendid kind of life . . .' 

Never was there a winter of such mass assemblies either before or after 1948-49. Quaintly, that season the fans were complaining about the price of football. In the two decades between the wars, admission prices had doubled, from sixpence (21/2p) to a shilling (5p) for a standing adult male. When League soccer resumed in 1946, admission had risen by half to 1s 6d. In 1948 it had been upped to 1s 9d which many considered exorbitant. They still turned up however - and how. (By the end of the Fifties, 3s was the turnstile price, a decade later 5s (25p), and by 1980 £1 (new money). By another decade, as we know, prices had really begun to get out of hand . . . 

Of course, during the half century the costs of running a League club had itself started to escalate even before the 1960 abolition of the minimum wage for players. With the crowds, transfer fees were suddenly on a corresponding upwards spiral: in 1946 the Liverpool forward Albert Stubbins carried the record, £13,000, on his balding head; by the season of 1948-49 that had been sensationally doubled, first by the £25,000 for Johnny Morris's move from Manchester United to Derby County, then Eddie Quigley's for £1,000 more from Wednesday to Preston. 

Each Saturday afternoon of that seminal season half a century ago these almost totally male multitudes were enthralled by players and teams which still summon up a vibrant resonance for those of a certain generation. With so many servicemen being demobbed around the South Coast, by 1948-49 Portsmouth had the pick of the crop and they won the first of their two successive League championships, ending a thrilling campaign five points clear of Manchester United and Derby. 

And particularly stirring hymns are still sung about two players in Hull and Nottingham: the previous season, two of the game's (still) legendary forwards had audaciously left their all-conquering First Division fields for the Third (regionally organised) Division. Hull City were in the Third (North), Notts County in the Third (South). From Sunderland, Raich Carter had at once transformed the latter and from Chelsea for a record £20,000 Tommy Lawton had arrived in Nottingham where County, gates quadrupled at a stroke, scored 76 goals in Lawton's first 25 matches (nine past Ipswich and Exeter, and 11 past Newport County). 

Eastwards, Hull and all around was also perpetually and joyously en fete throughout that 1948-49 winter. In fact, it was to take Lawton another season to win County promotion but the sleek grey fox Carter drove Hull to inevitable promotion in the northern section. 

To the table-topping match with Rotherham United on Christmas morning 1948, Boothferry Park drew the Third Division's still all-time record League attendance - 49,655. On Christmas morning! That sensational figure, however, was slaughtered just eight Saturdays later in the FA Cup, when (having disposed cruelly of Yeovil in front of that 81,000 in the fifth round) holders Man United came to Hull for the sixth on 26 February 1949, and, quite incredibly, 55,019 turned up. Still, Boothferry's record by a mile. 

On that same wintery sixth-round afternoon Derby County went south, to lose to Portsmouth. The throng of 51,385 remains Fratton Park's highest by far - and will do so for ever and ever amen. In the epic winter of 50 years ago; with its cast of millions - or 41,272,414 to be precise.

 
 

 

Thanks for the ground Work with that interesting infomation fella  just short of 50,000 for a ull city v rotherham utd division 3 game is mind blowing when you think about it alongside crowds at football when i have been watching at grounds since 1970s > i can only think of 3 times that i have been to a League game since my first time of watching games where 50,000+ was inside the ground and they was all at old Trafford and one of those was a FA-cup drawn game . 
 

then i have been to division 3 games with less than 1000 inside the ground when donny was dropping  into the conference League and getting dicked 8-1 by likes of orient etc etc . 

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10 hours ago, ddrblue said:

Thanks for the ground Work with that interesting infomation fella  just short of 50,000 for a ull city v rotherham utd division 3 game is mind blowing when you think about it alongside crowds at football when i have been watching at grounds since 1970s > i can only think of 3 times that i have been to a League game since my first time of watching games where 50,000+ was inside the ground and they was all at old Trafford and one of those was a FA-cup drawn game . 
 

then i have been to division 3 games with less than 1000 inside the ground when donny was dropping  into the conference League and getting dicked 8-1 by likes of orient etc etc . 

  Total Highest Lowest Average
Home 973,506 77,696 25,864 46,357
Away 758,007 58,020 18,693 36,096
Total 1,731,513 77,696 18,693 41,226

The attendances for us during 1948/49.

This is taken from the bounder.friardale site . A great site for all things about our history.

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On 15/10/2020 at 14:50, Stretford Ender said:

I think a primary school art project ended up on United's third kit this year.

Well after allowing themselves to get gubbed 6-1 by Sp*rs, I think your boys should be made to wear that kit every game as punishment!

Tricky run of fixtures for you guys. Newcastle, PSG, then us. IF you lost all three, will OGS still be in a job?

 

 

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24 minutes ago, Nibs said:

Well after allowing themselves to get gubbed 6-1 by Sp*rs, I think your boys should be made to wear that kit every game as punishment!

Tricky run of fixtures for you guys. Newcastle, PSG, then us. IF you lost all three, will OGS still be in a job?

 

 

I doubt it. I have a bad feeling about this season. From what I'm hearing from ex-players (Evra has been the most vocal) and the good journos, there's severe unrest inside Old Trafford. I've seen it before though when Busby retired and it has that feel about it again.

Newcastle beat us last year and I reckon PSG will be out for blood. By the time we play Chelsea, we might well be on the ropes. I hate to see this happening but the way the club is mismanaged from the top down, it has an inevitable feeling about it.

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12 hours ago, chi blue said:

77k crowd for a mid table game, surely not, we only got crowds from 2003! “Where were we when we were sh*t”

My dad told me they got huge crowds in the immediate post-war years. He went to Wembley for the 1948 FA Cup final and said the official attendance didn't really reflect the true size of the crowd.

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5 minutes ago, Stretford Ender said:

I doubt it. I have a bad feeling about this season. From what I'm hearing from ex-players (Evra has been the most vocal) and the good journos, there's severe unrest inside Old Trafford. I've seen it before though when Busby retired and it has that feel about it again.

Most Utd fans I know have never felt OGS was up to it anyway. I like him as a bloke, but it's a massive job for someone who doesn't really have much of a track record for a job that size. I know folk can say the same about us and Lamps and that could turn out to be the case too - only time will tell.

Can see Pochettino in charge at Utd before Christmas though and I guess the majority of Utd fans would be happy with that?

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Just now, Nibs said:

Most Utd fans I know have never felt OGS was up to it anyway. I like him as a bloke, but it's a massive job for someone who doesn't really have much of a track record for a job that size. I know folk can say the same about us and Lamps and that could turn out to be the case too - only time will tell.

Can see Pochettino in charge at Utd before Christmas though and I guess the majority of Utd fans would be happy with that?

Loved him as a player. However, he's been a manager for a long time, far longer than Frank has so a comparison is unwarranted. Frank seems to have a good plan and I really rate Jody Morris. We've got Mike Phelan who, though he was Fergie's number 2, has done sweet FA since 2013. Poch would need his head seeing to if he took the job. You could have anyone in there but as long as the Glazers are prioritizing commercial success over sporting, the underlying problem will remain. If Jose couldn't deal with them, what price Poch? It would be like having Levy on his back plus his evil twin.

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Chelsea+Utd+1968+69-----688+%25281%2529.

Not sure of the year, possibly 1969/70?

Bobby-Charlton-ELLE-Man-4.jpg

Not sure of the date of this shot. Could be the same game. If it was December 1969, you won 2-0.

Edit: The December game was at Old Trafford so it can't be that. Probably the March 1969 game when you won 3-2 at your place. Tambling, Hutchinson, and Webb scored for Chelsea, James and Law for United.

 

 

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2 hours ago, Stretford Ender said:

I doubt it. I have a bad feeling about this season. From what I'm hearing from ex-players (Evra has been the most vocal) and the good journos, there's severe unrest inside Old Trafford. I've seen it before though when Busby retired and it has that feel about it again.

Newcastle beat us last year and I reckon PSG will be out for blood. By the time we play Chelsea, we might well be on the ropes. I hate to see this happening but the way the club is mismanaged from the top down, it has an inevitable feeling about it.

There allways seem to be a issue within the ranks at man utd when they keep on getting bad results and the tide of whatever forward direction starts to turn > you start to read about a leak or leaks within the dressing room which inturn allways adds more pressure to the manager > things like the players dont like the way they train etc etc > think ronney was said to have gave out leaks once to help bring his manager down . There os Something quite rotten with Manchester United FC that  needs to be cleared out whoever the leaks are comming from . 
 

i just hope that Ole is still at the wheel when cfc play against them as that alone will give more that half a chance of 3 PTS ,but if United have a new manager installed and Even if it was kermit the frog or uncle Bulgaria the new manager bounce would give the mancs the 3 PTS 

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Kermit the frog.........superb. I agree we sent agent Jose in and i feel they detected a problem as just when we could have got em relegated they kicked him out. Hopefully with the North London Scum he will succed in his mission of "make em die"

This Man U fella knows his football so welcome to the site. Though to this day anyone South of Watford why do they follow Northern teams ?

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