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We've got a new Kepa


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I must have missed the rule saying the manager can enter the pitch as these please considering the number of "professional" pundits saying Sarri should have done this.  I mean maybe they can, but I've not seen it..... what I have seen is managers be fined for leaving their technical area, and one would think entering the pitch is a much bigger no no.

Also, are people actually suggesting a middle aged man try to physically pull off the field a professional athlete twice his size and around a third of his age? Ya, no way that would backfire spectacularly and create an even bigger crisis :wink:

 

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Just imagine if sarri had come onto the pitch ran over to the goal and confronted kepa, imagine if he actually did attempt to physically edge him of the pitch, which is what some people are suggesting. It wouldve been an even bigger story. I can just imagine the same people saying sarri should never have confronted him, it was unprofessional etc. 

 

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10 minutes ago, big blue said:

Just imagine if sarri had come onto the pitch ran over to the goal and confronted kepa, imagine if he actually did attempt to physically edge him of the pitch, which is what some people are suggesting. It wouldve been an even bigger story. I can just imagine the same people saying sarri should never have confronted him, it was unprofessional etc. 

 

"just shows the weakness of his authority that he felt the need to do that".... "How unprofessional! Could you even imagine that SAF would of demeaned himself in such a public fashion?" ..... "No way he can get the dressing room on side after embarrassing a player like that" .... " Destroyed the confidence of the young keeper they just spent a record fee on & embarrassed the club"....

That's what we likely would of heard from probably about 80% of the pundits saying he should have confronted Kepa on the pitch if he had actually done so.

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4 minutes ago, Richard P said:

The only thing about the situation that looks out of place is if it was a so called misunderstanding why would you get fined. It just makes the explanation look like a lie, which means the fine is more to do with what we all saw.

Good point

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7 hours ago, chi blue said:

Should of banned Chris Sutton from team after half a dozen games when he was with us due to him being sh*te

It's funny I've read Sutton on his Chelsea move and he said nerves got the better of him and he saw it with hindsight as a lack of self-esteem. Funny for me yet it suggests even in the 90s we were seen as a big club by some.

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37 minutes ago, Strider6003 said:

It's funny I've read Sutton on his Chelsea move and he said nerves got the better of him and he saw it with hindsight as a lack of self-esteem. Funny for me yet it suggests even in the 90s we were seen as a big club by some.

We've always been a big club mate, especially with the lack of success we had during our first 90 years of being a club. I believe of the top 10 highest attendances in the last century we had 3 of them, also I'm sure I read somewhere that up until the late 70's we had a higher average home attendance than Spurs and Arsenal, over the previous 75 years. If you see some of the crowds we had compared to the others, the vintage forum recently had attendance where we had 60k and Arsenal had 25k.Even the lean years of 70's and 80's our away support was bigger than Spurs and Arsenal and that was when were div 2.

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25 minutes ago, chi blue said:

We've always been a big club mate, especially with the lack of success we had during our first 90 years of being a club. I believe of the top 10 highest attendances in the last century we had 3 of them, also I'm sure I read somewhere that up until the late 70's we had a higher average home attendance than Spurs and Arsenal, over the previous 75 years. If you see some of the crowds we had compared to the others, the vintage forum recently had attendance where we had 60k and Arsenal had 25k.Even the lean years of 70's and 80's our away support was bigger than Spurs and Arsenal and that was when were div 2.

Away support I agree, yet I started going in late 88/89 and we compared poorly with stadiums and attendance with Utd, Arsenal, Liverpool and Tottenham in those days, IMO

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I'm still stunned that this comedy sideshow unfolded at a critical moment in a cup final, potentially throwing any tactical masterplan Sarri may have had with the goalkeeper swap, unnerving the others before their spot kicks, and at the very least making us a laughing stock (again). Personally, I'm keen to draw a line under it and move on. The club have fined him, and Sarri will deal with him how he sees fit; if he drops him, fine. If he doesn't, that's fine too, he's the boss. Whatever decision gets made, I trust it'll be the one that most benefits the team. We need to minimise the negativity right now, and I just hope that everything has been straightened out behind the scenes and all is well in the camp. We all know the media are waiting to reignite this story when the team sheet is released for Spurs either way, so there's no winning with them.

 

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32 minutes ago, Strider6003 said:

Away support I agree, yet I started going in late 88/89 and we compared poorly with stadiums and attendance with Utd, Arsenal, Liverpool and Tottenham in those days, IMO

Yes can't disagree there, we were way behind regarding stadium and image as well, Arsenal were your posh boys upper class bollox that never did a thing wrong, spurs had hoddle, ardiles and Ricky villa, Liverpool were the media darlings and united were united, still living off sir Matt, best and Charlton. We on the other hand had uncle ken,  the shed and the hooligans. Regarding home attendances they weren't that bad compared to others considering lack of success, anyway gone way off on a tangent and off topic sorry everyone, regarding Kepa my opinion should be dropped without doubt. 

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18 minutes ago, coco said:

If not the club or players you can rely on the fans to have a sense of humour:laugh2:

I feel like laughing off the situation is really our best course of action here. If we start booing Kepa or something similar, the sense of acrimony will only continue, and the bad feeling will only persist. 

Imaging how good it would feel if we got a big, cracking, hilarious win against Tottenham?

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Kepa should be straight back in, he's young and made a mistake.

Caballero seems to be very level headed and handled the whole thing very well, credit to him. Hopefully Kepa learns from him and what happened. 

 

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30 minutes ago, bisright1 said:

Can you copy and paste?

Here you go:

 

When I saw the images of Arrizabalaga pleading to stay on, I tried to imagine how he felt when he realised he was being subbed.

First of all, let’s end this myth he was being replaced because Willy Caballero is a penalty-saving specialist. If that is the case, why was there no substitution before the penalty shoot-out in the semi-final against Tottenham Hotspur? Maurizio Sarri made only two substitutions that night and had the option of Willy Caballero on the bench. Arrizabalaga made a crucial save in the shoot-out from Lucas Moura. Why would he have envisaged being replaced at the same stage of a final? If a manager intends to make such a radical decision, it must be discussed beforehand. Obviously it was not, or there would be no ‘misunderstanding’ as Chelsea put it.
To substitute a goalkeeper in those situations is the ultimate humiliation. There has to be a good reason for it. You have a 24-year-old keeper playing in the biggest game of his career so far and he was about to have the moment taken from him. I – and anyone else – would be confused and livid. He is the world’s most expensive goalkeeper trying to justify his fee and prove himself after a difficult debut season at Stamford Bridge. He had just made a crucial save to deny Sergio Agüero and kept a clean sheet over 120 minutes against a side that put six past him two weeks ago. It is no wonder he wanted the chance to be a hero.

In that situation, Arrizabalaga had two choices. Stand his ground to convince the manager there was no cause to take him off because he was not injured, or accept the decision and show his anger on the bench or in the dressing room later. The consensus is he should have taken option two. That is easier said than done in the heat of the moment. You do not play in a cup final every day of the week.

While I agree once the manager orders you off you must go, I also believe these were extraordinary circumstances where Sarri made the wrong decision based on misinformation. The goalkeeper was not injured. He wanted to communicate that and, ultimately, Sarri changed his mind.
There was an outpouring of support for Sarri after the game and in the following days. I think Arrizabalaga deserved more than was afforded him for finding himself in a situation he would never have been prepared for. 
These incidents are rare, but not unprecedented.
Lionel Messi, Cristiano Ronaldo and Zlatan Ibrahimovic have all refused to come off when summoned at least once in their careers.  Were they hung out to dry because of it? It never looks good when a player openly disagrees with the manager’s decision. They should go off when told, but there is nothing wrong with being reluctant and furious when doing so. 
 
All those former players lining up to have a pop at Arrizabalaga ought to ask themselves if they went through their career without at least once acting in a manner deemed disrespectful to their manager. It regularly happens in an emotional sport like football. 
Managers, coaches and supporters can sometimes want it both ways, demanding the team ethic always comes first while simultaneously breeding players who will take such individual pride in their performance they never want to give up their shirt. In these instances it can seem like a one-way relationship for the player, where they are justifiably expected to give 100 per cent every day in training and on the pitch, while at the same time being prepared to behave like a choirboy if they are denied the chance to play in a match.

When I first broke into the Liverpool side as a teenager, I gave what I considered a respectful, professional interview about my role in the squad. I had made my first start, played well and scored, but said I understood it if I was left out of the next game.
The first team coach, Sammy Lee, pulled me to one side and said: “Never say that again. Never give the manager an easy excuse not to pick you.”

I kept that attitude for the rest of my career. No manager was going to leave me out without knowing how I felt about it. It is no different when you are subbed. 
In 2001, I was so upset at being left out of the Charity Shield, when I was handed the winners’ medal I threw it into the crowd. Liverpool’s manager at the time, Gérard Houllier, only read about it in the newspaper. My feeling was I had made no contribution to the result so didn’t want a medal. A few days later I regretted it, sent out an appeal and got the medal back. I am sure Arrizabalaga felt differently - like I did - away from the emotion of a match day.

Those supporters who accuse players of putting their own interests first, or failing to respect the ‘team ethic’, should recall those times they were a player, whether at school or for a local club. How did you feel standing on the touchline having been left out, or when being told to come off with a game in the balance? Why do you imagine it is any different for the professionals?
It makes you feel you have not contributed enough even if your side has won. Your mood is soured. Something is missing. This is how the most successful players are raised to feel. Never to accept second best personally as well as collectively. It makes them tick. Seeing players trudge off the pitch, reluctant to shake the manager’s hand, is the least you expect. 
So we should lay off Arrizabalaga, or anyone else who expresses their discontent when threatened with or given the hook. 
Show me a player happy to come off - especially in a cup final - and I would question whether they had the right attitude to be selected in the first place.

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