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Chelsea breakaway from breakaway European Super League


Would you pay to watch Chelsea in a European Super League ?  

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  1. 1. Would you pay to watch Chelsea in a European Super League ?

    • Yes
      20
    • No
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    • Not sure yet
      22


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https://www.chelseafc.com/en/news/2021/04/23/a-letter-to-supporters-of-chelsea-fc-

The Owner and Board of Chelsea Football Club would like to address Chelsea supporters about the events which have taken place over the past few days. We have taken time since withdrawing from the ESL to speak directly to various supporter groups and listen to their views and concerns.

Our ambition with Chelsea Football Club has always been to make it the best club in the world, both on the pitch and in how we work with, and give back to the community off it.

The joint decision to join the ESL was driven by this same ambition. When it became clear that a new league might be formed, we did not want Chelsea FC to miss out on the opportunity to play in such a potentially prominent league, nor did we want to risk the Club falling behind our closest English and European rivals in competitive terms.

As a Club, we are committed to an open and regular dialogue with our fans and other stakeholders, but, on this occasion, regrettably, due to time constraints and confidentiality restraints, this was not achieved.

As concerns were raised following the announcement, the Club took a step back to listen and speak to supporters. Following those conversations and taking into account the extremely strong views against the proposal, we reassessed our initial decision and decided we did not want to be part of this league.

We also recognise the sentiment that had been expressed about whether the ESL relied strongly enough on sporting merit. This is something we had strong concerns about from the start and were confident would have been addressed during a further consultation process with various stakeholders, along with other concepts in the proposal about which we had reservations. We firmly believe that we must protect a structure which allows all clubs, players and supporters to dream of, and achieve, success.

We recognise we should have addressed these issues in advance of joining the group. The Owner and Board understand that involving the Club in such a proposal was a decision we should not have taken. It is a decision we deeply regret.

Another important factor in the decision to withdraw was the potential damage to the Club’s reputation and work on good causes. So much effort has gone into community work off the pitch over the last 17 years, and there was a risk that all of the Club’s efforts directed by the Owner on fighting racism, antisemitism, homophobia and other discriminatory behaviours would be lost. We could not afford to jeopardise the significant advances we have made in these areas, nor the vital and ongoing work of the Chelsea Foundation in other areas of our communities.

Chelsea Football Club is first and foremost a club rooted in tradition and community. We are also an ambitious club, and we have always strived to be the very best. In order to do that, we must constantly strive to improve and sometimes take risks.

We always welcome a debate about how we as a club develop and take on these new challenges. There needs to be room for disagreements, debates as well as mistakes, and we need to give each other the benefit of the doubt, and understand that we all have the best interest of the Club at heart. Mistakes are unavoidable, but it’s the ability to address those mistakes and jointly move forward which makes us strong as a club and community.

The Club always tries to be open and transparent with its supporters, and we remain committed to this in the future and will take actions to rebuild the trust of the supporters that we have enjoyed to this point. As such, the Club renews its commitment to listen to and engage with its supporters far better in future. The Board will lead consultations with supporter groups and other stakeholders on new mechanisms or structures that develop and safeguard fan representation in the Club’s work.

The Club does ask, however, that this dialogue is conducted in a respectful way. The abuse which some club representatives have been the target of over the past few days is not acceptable. Antisemitism, sexism, racism and threats of violence have no place in our community nor in this discussion. We hope that you will help us make sure that a respectful tone remains, even when we disagree.

Chelsea has a very rich history, and we know we are very fortunate to play a part in that. The Club was here before us, and will be here long after us. Our job is to ensure we are as successful as we can be today, as well as build for the future.

The Owner and Board thank you for your continued support for the Club.

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20 minutes ago, Boyne said:

https://www.chelseafc.com/en/news/2021/04/23/a-letter-to-supporters-of-chelsea-fc-

The Owner and Board of Chelsea Football Club would like to address Chelsea supporters about the events which have taken place over the past few days. We have taken time since withdrawing from the ESL to speak directly to various supporter groups and listen to their views and concerns.

Our ambition with Chelsea Football Club has always been to make it the best club in the world, both on the pitch and in how we work with, and give back to the community off it.

The joint decision to join the ESL was driven by this same ambition. When it became clear that a new league might be formed, we did not want Chelsea FC to miss out on the opportunity to play in such a potentially prominent league, nor did we want to risk the Club falling behind our closest English and European rivals in competitive terms.

As a Club, we are committed to an open and regular dialogue with our fans and other stakeholders, but, on this occasion, regrettably, due to time constraints and confidentiality restraints, this was not achieved.

As concerns were raised following the announcement, the Club took a step back to listen and speak to supporters. Following those conversations and taking into account the extremely strong views against the proposal, we reassessed our initial decision and decided we did not want to be part of this league.

We also recognise the sentiment that had been expressed about whether the ESL relied strongly enough on sporting merit. This is something we had strong concerns about from the start and were confident would have been addressed during a further consultation process with various stakeholders, along with other concepts in the proposal about which we had reservations. We firmly believe that we must protect a structure which allows all clubs, players and supporters to dream of, and achieve, success.

We recognise we should have addressed these issues in advance of joining the group. The Owner and Board understand that involving the Club in such a proposal was a decision we should not have taken. It is a decision we deeply regret.

Another important factor in the decision to withdraw was the potential damage to the Club’s reputation and work on good causes. So much effort has gone into community work off the pitch over the last 17 years, and there was a risk that all of the Club’s efforts directed by the Owner on fighting racism, antisemitism, homophobia and other discriminatory behaviours would be lost. We could not afford to jeopardise the significant advances we have made in these areas, nor the vital and ongoing work of the Chelsea Foundation in other areas of our communities.

Chelsea Football Club is first and foremost a club rooted in tradition and community. We are also an ambitious club, and we have always strived to be the very best. In order to do that, we must constantly strive to improve and sometimes take risks.

We always welcome a debate about how we as a club develop and take on these new challenges. There needs to be room for disagreements, debates as well as mistakes, and we need to give each other the benefit of the doubt, and understand that we all have the best interest of the Club at heart. Mistakes are unavoidable, but it’s the ability to address those mistakes and jointly move forward which makes us strong as a club and community.

The Club always tries to be open and transparent with its supporters, and we remain committed to this in the future and will take actions to rebuild the trust of the supporters that we have enjoyed to this point. As such, the Club renews its commitment to listen to and engage with its supporters far better in future. The Board will lead consultations with supporter groups and other stakeholders on new mechanisms or structures that develop and safeguard fan representation in the Club’s work.

The Club does ask, however, that this dialogue is conducted in a respectful way. The abuse which some club representatives have been the target of over the past few days is not acceptable. Antisemitism, sexism, racism and threats of violence have no place in our community nor in this discussion. We hope that you will help us make sure that a respectful tone remains, even when we disagree.

Chelsea has a very rich history, and we know we are very fortunate to play a part in that. The Club was here before us, and will be here long after us. Our job is to ensure we are as successful as we can be today, as well as build for the future.

The Owner and Board thank you for your continued support for the Club.

A much shorter apology would have sufficed. Corporate claptrap and spin undermines that. 

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Crap statement for me ... trying way too hard to justify what they did. Arsenal's hit a much better note, and several days earlier. Sadly, for me at least though, I don't think there is any sort of apology that really works ... no good shutting the stable door after the horse has already bolted. This is like catching the love of your life in bed with someone else. The relationship is never quite the same ever again, no matter how forgiving you think you are ... and most probably now a doomed relationship as well, even if it ends up taking a few years to come to finality ...

There need to be some serious ownership changes and sackings at board level in all 12 of these clubs ... and not merely "resignations" by the likes of Ed Woodward.

Edited by Sexyfootball
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9 hours ago, Spiller86 said:

A much shorter apology would have sufficed. Corporate claptrap and spin undermines that. 

I dint think anyone would of had much positive to say about anything they would of released.

Having said that now we can see atleast why it took so long. It's a f**king novel.

For me this would of been the perfect statement:

To our beloved chelsea fans, especially MaltaBlue, we f**ked up and we're soz.

In our defence we were a bit conned into this.we got fed a load of BS last Friday and was only given until saturday afternoon to decided. Just like our Timo Werner we succumbed to the pressure.

Please stop sending us death threats and all the racist, sexist and anti semitic crap, please send all your hate in a way befitting of a chelsea supporter to the other teams involved.

Much love,

Ro and the gang

Edited by Malta Blue
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9 hours ago, axman2526 said:

Yeah that reads like it was drafted by a robot or a lawyer, not a real human being.

Reads like robot lawyer. From the board. Bruce Buck is on the board. Bruce Buck is a lawyer.

Bruce Buck is a robot.

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3 minutes ago, Munkworth said:

Reads like robot lawyer. From the board. Bruce Buck is on the board. Bruce Buck is a lawyer.

Bruce Buck is a robot.

That kind of Monty python logical thinking is how I base all decisions in my life

something fairy GIF

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37 minutes ago, Malta Blue said:

I dint think anyone would of had much positive to say about anything they would of released.

Having said that now we can see atleast why it took so long. It's a f**king novel.

For me this would of been the perfect statement:

To our beloved chelsea fans, especially MaltaBlue, we f**ked up and we're soz.

In our defence we were a bit conned into this.we got fed a load of BS last Friday and was only given until saturday afternoon to decided. Just like our Timo Werner we succumbed to the pressure.

Please stop sending us death threats and all the racist, sexist and anti semitic crap, please send all your hate in a way befitting of a chelsea supporter to the other teams involved.

Much love,

Ro and the gang

The club addressed me as "Dear Val". I can't decide between objecting to this as too informal and Ikea-like, or being delighted I'm on buddy-buddy terms with the board.

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I doubt I’m the first to mention it, and apologies for the repetition if so, but having discussed it all with a few friends I consider to be quite well-informed, the most interesting thing that came up and perhaps the single biggest driver of the whole initiative is:

Real Madrid is bankrupt. Barca may be too. 

But let’s focus on Real Madrid. It makes perfect sense. In the immediate aftermath of Perez’s statement i and many others noted what a lot of BS it was. But it all makes perfect sense once you realise that he was projecting - that every time he said the word “football” what he really meant was “Real Madrid”. 
 

When he talked about the need to save football, he meant save Real Madrid. When he talked about waning interest in football, he meant young people were losing interest in watching Real Madrid. (It stands to reason of course. Ive wondered over the years how the hell Real Madrid finance their exorbitant transfer costs and wage bills etc. I’m very interested if anyone has anything on their finances).

 

Understanding this, a fairly clear potential picture emerges of how this all came about and now it unraveled so quickly . Quick look at the actors and their motives:

JPM: money of course. And I’m speculating but since they understand money quite well, did they see Real potential bankruptcy as the way in?

Real Madrid: pending bankruptcy + declining interest in Spanish league ex el clasico.

Barca: less extreme version of the above?

Italians: similar decline in interest / fan apathy to Spain plus financial problems of their own? @Scott Harris mentioned this the other day.

Man U / Liverpool / Arsenal: Americans will American?

Tottenham / Man City / Chelsea: FOMO. They weren’t really ever keen but didn’t want to be left out if it was going ahead.

Premier league teams on aggregate: since they are in by far the most (only?) competitive domestic league, with by far the most interest worldwide, they had the most to lose and least to gain from all this. So it stands to reason that they were the ones to quickly realise it wasn’t in their interests and torpedo the plan.

Edited by Dean
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Just now, Valerie said:

The club addressed me as "Dear Val". I can't decide between objecting to this as too informal and Ikea-like, or being delighted I'm on buddy-buddy terms with the board.

RoRo as he likes to be known in his inner circle did mention to me that he was debating how to address you for quite a while. He decided he wanted you as a friend so he went for the informal option

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2 hours ago, Dean said:

I doubt I’m the first to mention it, and apologies for the repetition if so, but having discussed it all with a few friends I consider to be quite well-informed, the most interesting thing that came up and perhaps the single biggest driver of the whole initiative is:

Real Madrid is bankrupt. Barca may be too. 

But let’s focus on Real Madrid. It makes perfect sense. In the immediate aftermath of Perez’s statement i and many others noted what a lot of BS it was. But it all makes perfect sense once you realise that he was projecting - that every time he said the word “football” what he really meant was “Real Madrid”. 
 

When he talked about the need to save football, he meant save Real Madrid. When he talked about waning interest in football, he meant young people were losing interest in watching Real Madrid. (It stands to reason of course. Ive wondered over the years how the hell Real Madrid finance their exorbitant transfer costs and wage bills etc. I’m very interested if anyone has anything on their finances).

 

Understanding this, a fairly clear potential picture emerges of how this all came about and now it unraveled so quickly . Quick look at the actors and their motives:

JPM: money of course. And I’m speculating but since they understand money quite well, did they see Real potential bankruptcy as the way in?

Real Madrid: pending bankruptcy + declining interest in Spanish league ex el clasico.

Barca: less extreme version of the above?

Italians: similar decline in interest / fan apathy to Spain plus financial problems of their own? @Scott Harris mentioned this the other day.

Man U / Liverpool / Arsenal: Americans will American?

Tottenham / Man City / Chelsea: FOMO. They weren’t really ever keen but didn’t want to be left out if it was going ahead.

Premier league teams on aggregate: since they are in by far the most (only?) competitive domestic league, with by far the most interest worldwide, they had the most to lose and least to gain from all this. So it stands to reason that they were the ones to quickly realise it wasn’t in their interests and torpedo the plan.

With RM, Barca and Juventus still holding out something else becomes apparent.

Both Spain and Italy have a lot of political instability and economic woes.

I guess in these countries if people are hard up they cancel their TV / Broadband packages which results in less money going into Spanish or Italian football.

Results in either less money from La Liga and probably less from advertising re a smaller paying audience and add that to COV-ID.

As someone at NASA might say,

'Houston we have a problem'

 

 

 

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2 hours ago, Munkworth said:

Will do, it’s on zoom so I can just bung my headphones on and have a listen if I’m still working. 

The 1 meeting I would like to listen in to and I have just found out that I'm being dragged to the in laws and not getting back home until about 1 hour before kick off

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52 minutes ago, Strider6003 said:

With RM, Barca and Juventus still holding out something else becomes apparent.

Both Spain and Italy have a lot of political instability and economic woes.

I guess in these countries if people are hard up they cancel their TV / Broadband packages which results in less money going into Spanish or Italian football.

Results in either less money from La Liga and probably less from advertising re a smaller paying audience and add that to COV-ID.

As someone at NASA might say,

'Houston we have a problem'

 

 

 

💯. Would emphasise economic woes over political instability (always been there and not an obstacle in itself) and add to the mix that lethal serial killer - debt! When you extrapolate a favourable status quo into the future and borrow based on that assumption, things go pretty pear-shaped if/when that assumption isn’t met (see subprime crisis, eurozone debt crisis, and pretty much any financial crisis come to think of it).

While it might be quite funny if Real went bust, we should probably resist the schadenfreude as there may be a broader crisis of sustainability.

Something I’ve never quite understood happened about 5 years ago, give or take..: the prices paid for players skyrocketed (as in like quadrupled) over night. It was one transfer cycle and I can’t remember which. That jump wasn’t in response to any ramp-up in overall interest in the game / revenue as far as I know. Where did the money come from? And where will it come from in the future, especially if things never fully normalise (ie gate revenues fail to recapture previous levels)?

If a crisis were to bring about a lowering of a pay-scale, sums of money, that I find obscene, I’d be all for it. But my fear is that instead something like the super league does eventually emerge - something way more commercial than what we have now. After all, American athletes somehow get paid multiples of what footballers make in sports that most people find unwatchable. 
 

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Forget all this about the six clubs supporters trust they more often that not only represent the views of those who are members.

Put one side CST and just spend a minute or two reading about how most clubs supporters  really feel about their supporters trust.

Gone are the days when AST for instance can stand up in a shareholder at Arsenal meeting and ask a challenging question. Well they would say they got their point over but at the end of the day if it came to a vote the majority shareholder would say this or that make an apology but the reality is nothing changed in that the owner ultimately  got their way

Yep I had my letter yesterday at 9.47pm. I actually didn’t think it was a poor letter. I think it was balanced and if you read it properly it explained quite a lot of the circumstances that all came together to cause a perfect storm.

I actually find it odd that so many want to put some out to be hung drawn and quartered. Yep they got this one wrong but come off it in the case of RA he has been a magnificent owner . Listen to the the fans at the likes of Man Utd and Arsenal they hate the Kronkes and The Glaizers.

For me ironically Chelsea as an institution because of Ken Bates probably has the best  protection of all the clubs.

The CPO offers protection of the ground, of the name in effect they hold the keys to supporter involvement any owner has to take the CPO with him.

Finally I asked two questions of my two best mates who support Everton and Leeds . First if they fully believe in gaining promotion via the play offs is really a reflection of sporting merit?
 How can it possibly be right in a normal season when a team has gained far more points fail to gain promotion as opposed  the team who finished x number of points below just happens to not have any suspensions, or injuries on one match day ?

The second question was let’s fast forward three years. The “big six” have managed to convince 7 other teams that they proposing non promotion. Would they say no we don’t agree or would they just fall into line. I know the answer and so did they .

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51 minutes ago, terraloon said:

The second question was let’s fast forward three years. The “big six” have managed to convince 7 other teams that they proposing non promotion. Would they say no we don’t agree or would they just fall into line. I know the answer and so did they .

Not all the EPL clubs would agree and an appeal to the bigger clubs of the Championship would still result in a stand-off for me.

Re the Championship play-offs I agree the play-offs are a lottery that do not necessarily favour the placed league participant yet is something the Championship agreed upon.

1 hour ago, Dean said:

While it might be quite funny if Real went bust, we should probably resist the schadenfreude as there may be a broader crisis of sustainability.

Something I’ve never quite understood happened about 5 years ago, give or take..: the prices paid for players skyrocketed (as in like quadrupled) over night. It was one transfer cycle and I can’t remember which. That jump wasn’t in response to any ramp-up in overall interest in the game / revenue as far as I know. Where did the money come from? And where will it come from in the future, especially if things never fully normalise (ie gate revenues fail to recapture previous levels)?

If a crisis were to bring about a lowering of a pay-scale, sums of money, that I find obscene, I’d be all for it. But my fear is that instead something like the super league does eventually emerge - something way more commercial than what we have now. After all, American athletes somehow get paid multiples of what footballers make in sports that most people find unwatchable. 
 

Yes I wouldn't mind seeing Madrid have to play the youth for a season or two yet would not want to see them go under.

Re the jump in prices, supply and demand and a lot of clubs wanted the same players. Not sure if quality is falling or the scouts are more lazy and so we keep looking at players like Lukaku.

 

 

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11 minutes ago, Strider6003 said:

Not all the EPL clubs would agree and an appeal to the bigger clubs of the Championship would still result in a stand-off for me.

Re the Championship play-offs I agree the play-offs are a lottery that do not necessarily favour the placed league participant yet is something the Championship agreed upon.

Yes I wouldn't mind seeing Madrid have to play the youth for a season or two yet would not want to see them go under.

Re the jump in prices, supply and demand and a lot of clubs wanted the same players. Not sure if quality is falling or the scouts are more lazy and so we keep looking at players like Lukaku.

 

 

My point was say the required majority 15 teams voted against promo or relegation and the other 5 and the FA who have a vote voted against would those 5 who voted against just say no and pull out of the league ?

In terms of the bigger Championship teams they have a say

Edited by terraloon
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