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Chelsea breakaway from breakaway European Super League


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Would you pay to watch Chelsea in a European Super League ?  

151 members have voted

  1. 1. Would you pay to watch Chelsea in a European Super League ?

    • Yes
      20
    • No
      109
    • Not sure yet
      22


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13 hours ago, Argo said:

 

I agree that the money involved is ridiculous but that is dictated in a large part by TV and sponsorship.

However 4th place is not really a failure, given that the league members know from the start of the season that top 4 qualifies you for the Champions League. That is like saying finishing second in the Champions League group (but still qualifying for knockout stage) is failure. 

There is a big difference between qualifying for Champions League via a 4th place finish, and existing in a closed league without having to qualify at all. If we fail to qualify it may be at the expense of Leicester who would not even have been considered for the European Super League.

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  • 3 weeks later...

This kind of fine doesn't sit well with me. If Champions League rules don't have this written in I think it is illegal. I wouldn't pay it.

The sum is not big for Chelsea but the reason it is given for is these 8 clubs 'scared' everyone in the football world. In the end nothing happened. We just scared them. Is there a such fine? One of the reasons someone like UEFA and FIFA need a proper scare. They just make rules as they go and feel is good for them and their business. 

 

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https://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/football/57414151

The six Premier League clubs involved in the European Super League (ESL) have been fined a combined total of £22m.

Manchester United, Liverpool, Chelsea, Manchester City, Tottenham and Arsenal wanted to form a breakaway league

A further fine of £25m each and a 30-point deduction will be applied should they attempt a similar project again.

Meanwhile, Uefa has temporarily suspended disciplinary proceedings against Juventus, Barcelona and Real Madrid who are yet to renounce the ESL.

They are the only three clubs among the original 12 that signed up for the rebel competition that are yet to accept any punishment, with European football's governing body opening disciplinary proceedings against them in May.

The FA and Premier League are the latest to determine a punishment, although the £22m was described a "a gesture of goodwill" from clubs.

In a joint statement the league and the national governing body confirmed the money "will go towards the good of the game", which includes "new investment in support for fans" and will help fund grassroots and community projects.

"The six clubs involved in proposals to form a European Super League have today acknowledged once again that their actions were a mistake, and have reconfirmed their commitment to the Premier League and the future of the English game," the two bodies said in a statement.

"They have wholeheartedly apologised to their fans, fellow clubs, the Premier League and the FA.

"The Premier League and the FA have worked closely together throughout this process and this agreement brings both investigations into the matter to a conclusion."

BBC Sport understands Manchester United's owners the Glazer family, Liverpool owners Fenway Sports Group, Arsenal's majority shareholders Kroenke Sports Enterprises and Tottenham's owners will pay the fine rather than their clubs.

Former Manchester United and England defender Gary Neville, who has been a vocal critic of football's governance and the ESL, tweeted that the punishment is "an absolute embarrassment".

Nine of the ESL clubs - the six Premier League sides, plus AC Milan, Inter Milan and Atletico Madrid - were fined a similar amount by European governing body Uefa last month.

They agreed to pay 15m euros (£13.4m) between them and have 5% of their Uefa competition revenues held for one season, starting in 2023-24.

In May, Uefa said the other three clubs involved - Real, Barca and Juve - would face "appropriate action" under Uefa's disciplinary process having failed to distance themselves from the ESL.

BBC Sport was told the clubs were risking being kicked out of the Champions League if the case went against them.

The trio now appear likely to be allowed to play in next season's Champions League after the disciplinary proceedings lodged against them were brought to a halt.

The three clubs have stated their belief that an order issued by a Madrid court in April that prevented Uefa taking action against them was valid in Switzerland, where the governing body is based.

This has now been passed to the European Court of Justice for a ruling, which has led to the initial case being stopped.

Uefa say they are "confident" in their case and will "continue to defend its position in all the relevant jurisdictions".

However, the development means the case almost certainly will not reach its conclusion in time for any punishment to take effect in next season's Uefa tournaments, which for Italian and Spanish clubs begin with the European Conference League play-offs in August.

'ESL legacy should be restructure of game'

Meanwhile in England, Football Supporters' Association chair Malcolm Clarke says the action taken by the Premier League should not be the end of the matter if it wants to ensure a similar breakaway proposal will not return in the future.

"Whatever punishment the Premier League's in-house process decides upon, it cannot guarantee that clubs won't try similar again in the decades ahead," he said.

"The European Super League's legacy should be a total restructure of the game - an independent regulator, genuine power to fans, and wealth redistribution."

The negative reaction to the ESL has sparked a huge debate about how football is run.

The government has already announced a fan-led review into football governance and the prospect of an independent regulator in English football is set for a parliamentary debate after a petition, launched by a number of ex-footballers, gained more than 100,000 signatures.

What happened with the European Super League?

English football's 'big six' were part of a group that announced plans to form the breakaway league on 18 April.

It was quickly condemned by fans, football authorities and government ministers in the UK, and across Europe by Uefa and league associations. Leading players at some of the six clubs also signalled their disapproval.

Fan protests took place before Liverpool's game against Leeds at Elland Road on 19 April and Chelsea's meeting with Brighton at Stamford Bridge the following day.

By that stage there was already speculation Manchester City and Chelsea were considering pulling out of the league, and by the end of the night all six Premier League clubs had announced their intention to withdraw.

La Liga club Atletico Madrid and Italian sides AC Milan and Inter Milan pulled out the following day, prompting Juventus chairman Andrea Agnelli to admit the project could no longer proceed.

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22 minutes ago, Boyne said:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/football/57414151

The six Premier League clubs involved in the European Super League (ESL) have been fined a combined total of £22m.

Manchester United, Liverpool, Chelsea, Manchester City, Tottenham and Arsenal wanted to form a breakaway league

A further fine of £25m each and a 30-point deduction will be applied should they attempt a similar project again.

Meanwhile, Uefa has temporarily suspended disciplinary proceedings against Juventus, Barcelona and Real Madrid who are yet to renounce the ESL.

They are the only three clubs among the original 12 that signed up for the rebel competition that are yet to accept any punishment, with European football's governing body opening disciplinary proceedings against them in May.

The FA and Premier League are the latest to determine a punishment, although the £22m was described a "a gesture of goodwill" from clubs.

In a joint statement the league and the national governing body confirmed the money "will go towards the good of the game", which includes "new investment in support for fans" and will help fund grassroots and community projects.

"The six clubs involved in proposals to form a European Super League have today acknowledged once again that their actions were a mistake, and have reconfirmed their commitment to the Premier League and the future of the English game," the two bodies said in a statement.

"They have wholeheartedly apologised to their fans, fellow clubs, the Premier League and the FA.

"The Premier League and the FA have worked closely together throughout this process and this agreement brings both investigations into the matter to a conclusion."

BBC Sport understands Manchester United's owners the Glazer family, Liverpool owners Fenway Sports Group, Arsenal's majority shareholders Kroenke Sports Enterprises and Tottenham's owners will pay the fine rather than their clubs.

Former Manchester United and England defender Gary Neville, who has been a vocal critic of football's governance and the ESL, tweeted that the punishment is "an absolute embarrassment".

Nine of the ESL clubs - the six Premier League sides, plus AC Milan, Inter Milan and Atletico Madrid - were fined a similar amount by European governing body Uefa last month.

They agreed to pay 15m euros (£13.4m) between them and have 5% of their Uefa competition revenues held for one season, starting in 2023-24.

In May, Uefa said the other three clubs involved - Real, Barca and Juve - would face "appropriate action" under Uefa's disciplinary process having failed to distance themselves from the ESL.

BBC Sport was told the clubs were risking being kicked out of the Champions League if the case went against them.

The trio now appear likely to be allowed to play in next season's Champions League after the disciplinary proceedings lodged against them were brought to a halt.

The three clubs have stated their belief that an order issued by a Madrid court in April that prevented Uefa taking action against them was valid in Switzerland, where the governing body is based.

This has now been passed to the European Court of Justice for a ruling, which has led to the initial case being stopped.

Uefa say they are "confident" in their case and will "continue to defend its position in all the relevant jurisdictions".

However, the development means the case almost certainly will not reach its conclusion in time for any punishment to take effect in next season's Uefa tournaments, which for Italian and Spanish clubs begin with the European Conference League play-offs in August.

'ESL legacy should be restructure of game'

Meanwhile in England, Football Supporters' Association chair Malcolm Clarke says the action taken by the Premier League should not be the end of the matter if it wants to ensure a similar breakaway proposal will not return in the future.

"Whatever punishment the Premier League's in-house process decides upon, it cannot guarantee that clubs won't try similar again in the decades ahead," he said.

"The European Super League's legacy should be a total restructure of the game - an independent regulator, genuine power to fans, and wealth redistribution."

The negative reaction to the ESL has sparked a huge debate about how football is run.

The government has already announced a fan-led review into football governance and the prospect of an independent regulator in English football is set for a parliamentary debate after a petition, launched by a number of ex-footballers, gained more than 100,000 signatures.

What happened with the European Super League?

English football's 'big six' were part of a group that announced plans to form the breakaway league on 18 April.

It was quickly condemned by fans, football authorities and government ministers in the UK, and across Europe by Uefa and league associations. Leading players at some of the six clubs also signalled their disapproval.

Fan protests took place before Liverpool's game against Leeds at Elland Road on 19 April and Chelsea's meeting with Brighton at Stamford Bridge the following day.

By that stage there was already speculation Manchester City and Chelsea were considering pulling out of the league, and by the end of the night all six Premier League clubs had announced their intention to withdraw.

La Liga club Atletico Madrid and Italian sides AC Milan and Inter Milan pulled out the following day, prompting Juventus chairman Andrea Agnelli to admit the project could no longer proceed.

As stupid as this whole drama has been, I hope the club just cough the cash. There's no point dragging this battle to CAS court or whatever.

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Not fade away... published last week

 

He's right, of course, to defend his Club ( and other Clubs ) against impending insolvency, and he's not alone.

 

Napoli President Aurelio De Laurentiis angrily ranted against TV rights contracts and the Super League project. "I always told Andrea Agnelli he was getting this wrong.’

The patron was speaking at the Passepartout Festival and discussed the recent failed attempt to create a breakaway league, a plan Juventus, Real Madrid and Barcelona are still pushing.

“The Super League comes from the fact institutions try to build on our money and our investment. What interest does Real Madrid, Juve or Napoli have in playing the Champions League and going into debt in order to make €70-80-90-100m more when we spent €200-300m ( buying players/wages/Agents Fees ) to get there?

It doesn’t work.

“I am part of the ECA (European Club Association) and I always told Agnelli he was getting it wrong with the Super League, because they wanted to become the principle actors of the system, but instead they should’ve democratically left the door open to everyone.

“We do need to create another competition and take it away from UEFA, keeping UEFA as some sort of secretary general. We clubs would then give UEFA a percentage of the revenue rather than have them pay us.

“Agnelli, Perez and the others made the mistake of not declaring football has failed due to the institutions. They keep promising change and it never happens. It’s always, we’ll think about it, let’s see what happens. Football should be developing continually.”

 

The Napoli President was also asked about his difficult rapport with journalists. 😡😡 😡

“It’s not that I hate journalists. My press conferences are animated because they ask idiotic questions,” insisted ADL.

“It’s not that I don’t want to hear their comments, they are simply banal. It sounds like they are all copied and pasted from each other, can nobody think of something new?

 

De Laurentiis also turned his ire towards the growing impact of television rights and the coverage these companies demand in return.

“Can you imagine these players in the locker room concentrating before a game, there’s Kostas Manolas praying and kissing his little religious relics, another has his hands towards the sky in prayer, there’s someone with a ball ( Testicle ) hanging out, a willy ( RODney ) on the right, they arrive with their TV cameras and say they have a contract with Sky or whoever?

"We’re idiots, then.

“When I say football doesn’t work, it’s because we are old-fashioned. Unfortunately, when Sky started in Italy, it was a great television station, very Anglo-Saxon in style. Now you see even RAI or Mediaset are better, because they learned from that model and improved.”

••••••••••••••••••••••••••

Nor is this a new phenomena in GB  https://youtu.be/FtWO1QySBdo

 

 

 

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The way UEFA is handling things in Euros at the moment I don't think the ground for something like Super League is totally dead. That bunch is really peeing into their own cereals right now. And it is all their own doing. 

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