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Lee Hughes


Lofty

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I'm currently listening to Jon Gaunt (excuse the language) spouting off about Lee Hughes, who is either about to be released from prison, or has just been released from prison following a 6 year conviction for causing death by dangerous driving in 2004.

Gaunt is of the opinion that the sentence wasn't long enough, and that Hughes should not have been released on parole but should have served the full term of his sentence. Fine, that's his opinion. However, he also says that Hughes, having served his time, should not be allowed to play professional football again. And this I strongly disagree with. Firstly, who is he, who are we to judge? The bloke's done his time according to the law and should surely be allowed to resume, or at least attempt to resume, his career.

Not that I wish for one moment to trivialise the nature of the offence, but I see no justification for what in effect is Gaunt, and no doubt there will be many jumping on the same bandwagon, acting as self-appointed judge, jury and would-be executioner.

I did think of putting this in the non-football section, but to my mind, the the question of whether convicted criminals should be allowed to play professionally is a football issue.

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I did think of putting this in the non-football section, but to my mind, the the question of whether convicted criminals should be allowed to play professionally is a football issue.

Jermain Pennant, Tony Adams, maybe Dennis Wise I'm sure there are many more. (our own JT was close!) I could understand not wanting to put someone who had been arrested for fraud in charge of a pension company, but football?

Saying that.... with his previous who would want him? Sounds like a Jody Morris who got punished!

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If I got locked up for anything I would not get a job in this industry (insurance) when I got out, not a decent one anyway.

I agree that people should get a second chance once they've served their punishment (accept for certain crimes when people should just be put down!), but it's a social issue and not a football issue. It should not come down to how much money you can make your respective employer. But it always will.

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My personal feelings on this is that you should predominantly steer clear of making judgements on the cirumstances of an individual case and are better served considering the bigger picture. A legal system which differentiates on a case by case basis is wide open to inconsistency at best and corruption at worst.

Yes I think the sentence was too lenient but I think the sentencing for this sort of crime is too lenient across the board - whilst the law is failing in general there can be no grounds for one individual to be punished more severely for the same crime that others were punished less for.

As for being allowed to return to his 'trade' on his release I do think that is a cornerstone of the judicial system which should be protected and hence, as much as it will gall me to see him living a privileged life again whilst the family of his victims suffer on, I do believe it is the correct way to do things.

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Please forgive me.. but I agree with Gaunt on this one.. icon_eek.gif

How can this player go on to another great career (maybe), earning well and living a great lifestyle after "causing death by dangerous driving", and only serving 3 years..

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He has served his time, he did not hand out the leniant jail term, he more than likely appealed for parole (which is his right) and is now a free man with a criminal record, like thousands of others. Of course he should be able to play again, the crime he was punished for in no way connects with the his future career plans.

If the same thing were to happen to, say, Jude Law or Ray Winston, would they be banned from performing on stage or in front of the camera on their release.....of course not.

He has served his sentence and is a free man.

ps. not making light of the crime or the suffering of the family involved.

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If the same thing were to happen to, say, Jude Law or Ray Winston, would they be banned from performing on stage or in front of the camera on their release.....of course not.

He has served his sentence and is a free man.

ps. not making light of the crime or the suffering of the family involved.

Actors would maybe give up the big jobs, as would always carry the label, and would be showing no respect to the family concerned IMO.

Not only that, they would probably lose work.

but thats a different comparison..

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If the same thing were to happen to, say, Jude Law or Ray Winston, would they be banned from performing on stage or in front of the camera on their release.....of course not.

He has served his sentence and is a free man.

ps. not making light of the crime or the suffering of the family involved.

Actors would maybe give up the big jobs, as would always carry the label, and would be showing no respect to the family concerned IMO.

Not only that, they would probably lose work.

but thats a different comparison..

Michael Barrymore has carved a fine career for himself 169.gif

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He has served his time, he did not hand out the leniant jail term, he more than likely appealed for parole (which is his right) and is now a free man with a criminal record, like thousands of others. Of course he should be able to play again, the crime he was punished for in no way connects with the his future career plans.

If the same thing were to happen to, say, Jude Law or Ray Winston, would they be banned from performing on stage or in front of the camera on their release.....of course not.

He has served his sentence and is a free man.

ps. not making light of the crime or the suffering of the family involved.

Yes of course what he did was wrong, I don't think anyone's trying to deny that. Whether or not the sentence was long enough, whether he should be released on parole isn't the issue. Sentence has been passed and carried out. The demands that he shouldn't be allowed to play professional football, on the other hand, are something else entirely. It's not as if he's attempting to profit from his offence, as in the case of say, Jimmy Boyle or John McVicar - is it ok for ex-gangsters to make a mint from publishing and film rights?

Lee Hughes made a mistake, it's not as if he's likely to repeat the offence. If he ever did, then it would be right for the book to be thrown at him. In the meantime, let him live with what he's done and get on with his life as best he can.

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In any field if you're good enough at the job you do and someone thinks you can improve them enough to outweigh the negatives of employing an ex-crim then they will give you another chance. Be that Brad Pitt or Lee Hughes.

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Liverpool's Steve Finnan hit and killed an 81 year old while doing 58 mph in a 30 zone. He got off with a slap on the wrist. link

A few months after the fuss had all died down he got done for speeding along the same streach of road.

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Christ. They managed to keep that one quiet. Another case of one rule for Scousers and another for the rest of the human race ...

Mr Rebello stated that Mr Finnan had not been found guilty of any offence.

As I was saying.

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Crash investigator Pc Paul Hulme told the city's coroner that the vehicle was travelling at 58mph in the 30mph zone.

Mr Finnan said:

"I don't feel responsible and there's nothing I could do."

Traveling at twice the speed limit, how about slowing down!

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That's a total fix about Steve Finnan. Talk about a crooked constabulary.

Regarding the original point however, unfortunately there is no morality in justice. It does seem immoral that Lee Hughes could go back to a career where he earns lots of money and could be seen as a "role model" for young people etc. etc. whilst the family affected remain devastated and always will. But unfortunately, morality plays no part in our judicial system. He has served his time and is now entitled to return to his life having paid his penance. Is it right? No Is it life? Yes

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I don't understand this modern day role model persona.

back in ye olden days an actor was an actor, and a sportsman was a sportsman etc. role models were people who had done amazing things with their lives, and made sacrifices. People such as Florence Nightingale, Douglas Bader, etc not some dimwit that earns a lot of money.

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I agree, had the same conversation this morning.

Famous people used to be labelled as a Star of the screen, Star of the theatre, rock and roll star etc.........what the f**k is a (modern day) celebrity? Someone who has Max Clifford as a publicist?!!!

A few examples - Callum Best, Jade Goody, Paris Hilton - if these are role models then I fear for the next generation.

There is a famous for 'f*ck all' culture emerging!

Oxygen wasters!

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I think you have to do less and less to be considered a role model these days because of the gradual decay of the fabric of home life -more and more broken families meaning more and more kids without a natural role model from one side of their parents - if you're a boy with no father figure then where do you look for a role model? To a teacher? No chance, not in this day and age - to a local community person, phhh, you must be kidding!

You look to the people you see on TV, to the ones you have on your walls, to the ones who, in your eyes, and unlike yourself, don't have a trouble in the world. Often the less work they had to do to get there the more of a role model they become.

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I think you have to do less and less to be considered a role model these days

Guess that makes me a role model then icon_wink.gif

icon_lol.gif

Me too -

Loz:' Look at me Mini Loz, I can fart, drink a pint and eat Pakora all whilst scratching my a*se'

Mini Loz: My hero, just wait till I tell the boys at nursery!!

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