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Why Didn't The FA Get Hiddink?


The Brit

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changing tack from my previous and seemingly controversial rant, russia's performance tonight again put hiddink in the spotlight...once again he has taken an underachieving nation and not only got them to a major tournament and now in last eight of one, he has got them playing great footy...just sat there tonight thinking what if? the fa could have got him, but ended up with mcclown as they completely botched it...

England haven't had much luck over the years, but what a difference a top coach would have made

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changing tack from my previous and seemingly controversial rant, russia's performance tonight again put hiddink in the spotlight...once again he has taken an underachieving nation and not only got them to a major tournament and now in last eight of one, he has got them playing great footy...just sat there tonight thinking what if? the fa could have got him, but ended up with mcclown as they completely botched it...

England haven't had much luck over the years, but what a difference a top coach would have made

Because Russia got him?

He's getting paid comparable money without the intrusive, front-page pressure. He's 63 and would rather not deal with that sh*t.

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yes but the fa had a chance before he went to russia....he intimated he would have taken it but was very offended by the way they went about it...I don't think they even asked him for an interview in the end...doh!

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i remember hiddink's agent saying the fa ballsed it up or something like that...anyway, he has proved again why he should have been made england coach...or dare I say it chelsea coach...gets his teams to play quality and winning football

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  • 2 weeks later...

Interesting Gab Marcotti article on Hiddink:

Arsène Wenger once told me that there was only one way to judge how good a manager is: give each one in a league the same sum of money, tell him to assemble a team and then see who is top at the end of the season.

Alas, because we cannot do that, we have to rely on subjective tools. And even those are imperfect. A modicum of media savvy and a dash of spin can make anyone look better or worse than they are. Let me prove it to you.

Guus Hiddink is one of the best managers in the game

You need only to see his teams play to realise that he is one of the shrewdest tactical minds in the game. And he is a phenomenal motivator as well, a man who gives players the self-belief that enables them to overachieve.

But do not take my word for it. Look at his record. His first managerial stint at a big club was with PSV Eindhoven in 1987. He took over in March, they won the title in May. The next year they did the treble, winning the Dutch Cup and European Cup as well as the league. And the next season they did the double. What more do you want?

He went to Valencia – new league, new country – and took them into the top four two years in a row. Later, he went to Real Madrid and they won the World Club Cup. He returned to PSV in 2002 for four seasons, winning three league titles. And in 2004-05 he took them to the Champions League semi-finals, going out on the away goals rule to AC Milan, the eventual champions.

And that is just as club level. Some of his best work has come with national teams. He took Holland to the quarter-finals of Euro ’96 and the semi-finals of the 1998 World Cup, both times going out on penalties. In 2002 he took South Korea to the semi-finals of the World Cup. And four years later he helped Australia to qualify for the World Cup for the first time, getting them into the knockout phase.

Plus there was Euro 2008. First he helped a mediocre Russia team to qualify for the tournament ahead of England, then he took them to the semi-finals, knocking out heavily favoured Holland along the way.

Hiddink clearly is a serial overachiever and one of the best in the business. Or there is the counterview . . .

Guus Hiddink is a self-promoting opportunist

There is a reason why one Dutch commentator dubbed him Guus Geluk (after the Disney character, Gladstone Gander, Donald Duck’s far luckier cousin). Like Forrest Gump, he is in the right place at the right time.

For a start, you need to take those PSV titles with a grain of salt. PSV had won two on the bounce before he took over, so all he did was keep things going. And besides, with all due respect, Dutch titles are a dime a dozen.

That is why good Dutch managers go abroad and win things. And Hiddink is not one of them. He spent four seasons at Valencia and Fenerbahçe and never finished higher than fourth. OK, he won the World Club Cup with Real Madrid. Big deal. He was sacked halfway through the season, that is how bad they were. And how about his stint at Real Betis? Three months of futility with a team who finished eighteenth.

You want to talk about his exploits in Europe? OK, he did win the European Cup 20 years ago, but that was when it was a lot easier to do so, when there was only one club from each of the big leagues. And, by the way, that season he did not win a single game after the second round, only a series of boring draws. In fact, in his entire career he has won only one European Cup or Champions League match from the quarter-final stage onwards. Is this is your definition of genius?

But I am glad that you have brought up the national team because it is good to debunk a few more myths. He had one of the most talented Holland teams in history and won only one match out of four at Euro ’96. And at France ’98 he did knock out Yugoslavia and Argentina on the way to the semi-finals. He did it thanks to late, late goals, which may help to explain his Guus Geluk moniker.

South Korea? OK, you need a barrelful of salt for that one. Or have you forgotten the refereeing against Portugal, Spain and Italy? Three red cards, two penalties and a dozen or so dubious officiating decisions . . .

As for getting Australia to the World Cup, effectively he had to overcome only one team to do it (and, even then, it took penalties). Once there, what did the Socceroos do? They beat Japan – the only match they won in the tournament.

Russia? Don’t be deceived by their run to the Euro 2008 semi-finals. They won only two of their five games in 90 minutes – against Greece and Sweden. Oh, and before you say how these are great results because Russia and South Korea are poor teams whom Hiddink turned into competitive sides, consider instead that two of the past four Uefa Cup winners are Russian and that South Korea have qualified for every World Cup since 1986 (which is more than can be said for France, England and Holland).

The bottom line is that Hiddink’s greatest strength is self-promotion. With the complicity of a lazy and gullible media, he cultivates the image of a footballing sage when in fact his results indicate the opposite. The point of all this? We know and we don’t know. We don’t really see managers, except through the distorted lens of our own prejudices and bias, their own self-promotion (or lack thereof) and the cacophony of spin. And spin, as I hopefully showed above, can make someone such as Hiddink look like a visionary or an opportunist.

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/sport/col...icle4237569.ece

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Thats quite a stupid little article.

Yes in one off occasions luck plays a significant role in sucess, but simply counting the time Hiddink was lucky and ignoring the times he was unlucky paints an incorrect picture.

For example, when in charge of the Socceroos, Hiddink was unlucky with Japan's opening goal against us (the referee admitted he got that one wrong), unlucky to have to have that Croatian player booked three times before he was sent off, unlucky to have a suspect penalty given to Italy in second half injury time which lead to us getting knocked out by the eventual winners.

Fact is, every side his coached at international level has played good quality football well above what we would normally associate with a side of their quality (personell wise). As for club football?, I don't know, I haven't seen much of him in club football.

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surely the point is at the bottom there qaz-

We don’t really see managers, except through the distorted lens of our own prejudices and bias, their own self-promotion (or lack thereof) and the cacophony of spin. And spin, as I hopefully showed above, can make someone such as Hiddink look like a visionary or an opportunist.

and at the top

A modicum of media savvy and a dash of spin can make anyone look better or worse than they are. Let me prove it to you.

marcotti is pretty good I think, and IMO the article uses hiddink only as an example to prove his point.

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