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Andriy ShevaOhICan'tbearsedtocheeranymorechenko


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Great player once, great player still - if he leaves Chelsea! getmycoat.gif

He does not have to leave the Premiership to still be what he was at Milan.

Just go to a team which has real playmakers and not should-be-defender-or-even-a-spectator playmakers.

I love Chelsea, but I also know when to say we're bad.

And if anybody thinks that our midfield is working just fine needs a visit to a local mental institution.

Sheva is still a great striker, and will be for a few more years, but he won't be able to do much with our team, because our team doesn't even understand the meaning of the word "team", so it would be the best for him to go somewhere where they do.

There is no 'I' in 'TEAM', but there are way too many 'I's in Chelsea. getmycoat.gif

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it is actually really quite sad...whatever he has failed to do at chelsea, he will still go down in history as one of the greatest ever strikers, but it seems like he's a boxer who's had too many fights...who would have thought when sheva arrived a year ago that we would be lacking so much belief in him or maybe him lacking so much belief in himself?

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A great player once. But now a shadow of what he was.

Your views on Sheva have as much merit as mine on Drogba.

Chelsea's industry rewarded by Wise

By Henry Winter

Electronic Telegraph, 27th October 1999

Disciplined and determined, Chelsea deservedly went top of Champions' League Group H last night when Dennis Wise equalised with a wonderful goal, the ball placed arrogantly through Milan goalkeeper Christian Abbiati's legs.

Wise, who led Chelsea's spirited response to every Milan move, will seize the headlines but the acquisition of this important point stemmed from the industry of all Gianluca Vialli's players, embodied by Tore Andre Flo and Frank Leboeuf, who were both outstanding, though Leboeuf was caught out by Oliver Bierhoff for Milan's goal.

Chelsea need only a point from next week's visit of Hertha Berlin, who surprisingly lost at home to Galatasaray last night. Wise's goal holds extra significance as it ensures Chelsea will progress should they and Milan finish level on points.

The Turkish side came back from 1-0 down after Hertha captain Kjetil Redkal scored a 35th-minute penalty - to win 4-1. Beaten 5-0 in Istanbul by Chelsea last week and out of contention, Galatasaray had their tails up when Hakan Sukur headed home an equaliser three minutes after the break.

Sukur banged home a second in the 66th minute before goals by substitute Kerimoglu Tugay (81) and Buruk Okan, in injury time, sealed the win.

A scoreless opening hour in the San Siro had seen Chelsea at their intelligent best, defending from the front, rarely wasting possession and always looking to find the overlapping player. Flo was particularly impressive, the tall Norwegian dragging Milan's three central defenders out of position and constantly seeking to set up late-arriving team-mates, such as Dan Petrescu.

The Romanian departed at half-time but had proved a useful contributor, almost scoring after two minutes, following a good save from Flo by Abbiati. The keeper then denied Petrescu with his feet again after Flo had split the Italian defence asunder.

Chelsea's movement was terrific, thrillingly demonstrated after 21 minutes when Petrescu sent Wise scampering down the right. His cross, low and hard, was met by Flo but his shot flew over. Wise then invited Albert Ferrer to try his luck but the little Spaniard was thwarted by Abbiati's superb tip over.

Chelsea's huge support certainly finished the half in good voice but there were moments when their hearts must have been in their throats. Andriy Shevchenko, Milan's mobile and menacing forward, needed constant watching.

Quick of mind and body, Shevchenko ran here and there, testing the defensive experience of Leboeuf and Marcel Desailly, who had been given an emotional welcome by the Curva Sud. The former AC player responded by pointing at his heart and then at them.

Yet it was Desailly's partner at centre-half, Leboeuf, who proved the rock on which the occasional red-and-black waves foundered. He began with a wonderful tackle on Shevchenko but was fortunate not to concede a penalty when clearly tugging at the Ukrainian's shirt.

Shevchenko threatened most when meeting an 18th-minute free-kick, which curled wide, and then when beating Ferrer to head Serginho's flighted dead-ball against a post. But he was poorly served by Milan's largely uninspiring midfield, though Massimo Ambrosini tried to enliven proceedings with a fulminating 30-yarder which Ed De Goey pushed away eight minutes after the break.

These were worrying times for Chelsea. Oliver Bierhoff headed over and then on rushed Zvonimir Boban to introduce some guile into Milan's movements.

Moments after Gustavo Poyet had seen his close-range header brilliantly saved by Abbiati, Milan struck when Bierhoff beat Leboeuf to Serginho's cross and headed unstoppably past De Goey.

Vialli promptly replaced Poyet with Roberto Di Matteo, a switch that brought immediate and spectacular rewards. Di Matteo whipped a long pass forward, the ball falling sweetly over Maldini into the path of Wise, whose left-footed finish raced through Abbiati's legs.

I was at the game and I agree with everything Henry Winter wrote about that night. Especially the bit highlighted. Shevchenko played much of the game out wide, right and left flank, and went past players like they weren't there. He was so quick. He was fabulous. He was what age then? 22 or 23 ?

I got to see him live again just a few months later at Wembley. England 2 Ukraine 0. Our last home game before Euro 2000. Once more Shevchenko was superb. His movement, pace and strength were first class. Virtually everytime he got the ball he did something. I went with my brother-in-law and it was the first time he had seen Sheva play. He couldn't believe how fast he was.

To be honest, I don't much care whether you believe me or not Henry. I know that the Shevchenko I saw in those two games is not the same player we have struggling so badly at Chelsea now. And the fact that he can no longer fly past defenders, spin off markers, hold the ball up etc. etc. has nothing, absolutely nothing to do with systems, formations, trequartaristas, no:10's, no:2's long balls, short balls, round balls, square balls, balls into feet, balls into elbows, first time passes, weekend passes, Kyhber passes, Jose Mourinho, Nigella Lawson or the Labour government.

And, I repeat, it's sad to see a once great player being rolled over and bossed by journeymen EPL defenders who wouldn't have got close enough to spit at him when he was in his prime.

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I was at that game too, its in my top 3 Chelsea matches. Boy was it loud.

And Shev was awesome that night as he was so many times for Milan.

As for now ? His legs have gone, simple as.

Yesterday there was a moment in the 2nd half when someone played him through on the left and if he had any pace he couldve beaten Samba and gone clean through. No one in the pub I was in and no-one in the ground i suspect expected him to though, and of course he didnt.

As someone has already said, its quite sad now really. Unless you work in the AC Milan financial department that is of course.

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If people want to question Shevas performances and goals (or lack of) then fair enough but since he got here he has not once bitched about the club, any of the players or Jose. So i cant understand why people are questioning his attitude. Its not all his fualt and its not all Jose's but he has had hardly any service since he got here, He still got 14 goals last season and he will score more than Kalou or Pizarro if given games.

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I wouldn't question his attitude at all. My only question is why we wasted ?30m on him in the first place? The signs were already well there that Sheva's best days were behind him. I guess that is one of the draw backs of having a multi billionaire at the helm. We've been mugged big time. As Alan Hansen said on MOTD, telling us something we already knew - his legs have gone.

It's why I always wanted us to sign a young striker and one with hunger.

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Not only have his legs gone, they have so obviously gone, and it's been obvious since the first match he played for us.

He looks like he's playing from memory (repeating myself now).

He looks like he's stuck in a bad dream - the kind of dream where you are trying to run but can't quite run as fast as you'd like.

What I don't understand is why the posters who defend him on this site can't see that.

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it is actually really quite sad...whatever he has failed to do at chelsea, he will still go down in history as one of the greatest ever strikers, but it seems like he's a boxer who's had too many fights..

If i might come up with another metaphor: he has a stupid manager?

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I wouldn't question his attitude at all. My only question is why we wasted ?30m on him in the first place? The signs were already well there that Sheva's best days were behind him.

All absolutely true.

I don't see how anyone can question his attitude or comittment either. He is obviously giving his all. That's what makes it so sad. The brain is still in top gear but the body can't get out of second.

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I wouldn't question his attitude at all. My only question is why we wasted ?30m on him in the first place? The signs were already well there that Sheva's best days were behind him.

All absolutely true.

I don't see how anyone can question his attitude or comittment either. He is obviously giving his all. That's what makes it so sad. The brain is still in top gear but the body can't get out of second.

haha- the wit of the english football community belongs in science-fiction... or worlds biggests morons caught on camera..

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it is actually really quite sad...whatever he has failed to do at chelsea, he will still go down in history as one of the greatest ever strikers, but it seems like he's a boxer who's had too many fights..

If i might come up with another metaphor: he has a stupid manager?

Jose made him slow as a snail and weak as my gran? Ok, if it's Jose's fault that Sheva has lost all the physical skills requisite to be a striker (notice the omission of the term 'top class') then please can you explain what, exactly, Mourinho did to rob Sheva of his natural pace and strength? Was it the pre-season training in the US, or perhaps too strenuous a programme at Cobham?

Not disagreeing with you, just like to know why you think Jose is responsible for Sheva's declining physical attributes.

P

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Just you are spot on with your assessment of the situation. Blaming anyone is pointless - Sheva's legs have gone and no one is to blame. His first touch has gone because his brain thinks he's faster than he is - it still remembers him from the Henry Winter piece! Once his head catches up with (or slows down to) his body he'll realise he has to do things differently - use the experience he has to get that extra half yard needed to make a goal scoring opportunity. If he continues to think he has the pace of Sheva vintage 1997-2004, he'll struggle.

Personally I think he won't ever come good for us. Looking at the bigger picture I feel the club as a whole has reached an important phase, one where more than ever we realise the need to bring players through the system; when we need to take our focus off the immediate prize and look to lay foundations for the club in terms of players not just financially; where we need to recognise that players are not just commodities purchased to make the club "the biggest in the World by 2014". Sheva epitomises for me the wrong route the club has decided to go down. The sales and purchases this past couple of summers underlines for me a twisted philosophy within the club - most of the buys practical but average, the others impractical and disruptive; the sale of young players with potential just backs that twisted buying policy.

Sheva was a fantasy buy that I bought into as well but it quickly became apparent that the guy is done with top class football - now his presence just serves to back up the 'Billionaire's Toy' label that the club suffers.

Having slagged the guy off and had a quote about him regularly pop up on the memorables, it pains me to say this but the ?30m we spent on Sheva is money we pissed away; we should have spent it on the floppy-haired ponce from Spain, Torres. The guy is top-notch, will score a bag full of goals and would have had us top of the Prem if we'd bought instead of splashing out ?30m on a 30 year old has-been.

Hindsight..........

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Not only have his legs gone, they have so obviously gone, and it's been obvious since the first match he played for us.

He looks like he's playing from memory (repeating myself now).

He looks like he's stuck in a bad dream - the kind of dream where you are trying to run but can't quite run as fast as you'd like.

What I don't understand is why the posters who defend him on this site can't see that.

Liam

He can't have lost his legs in 2-3 months. He scored, what was it 17 goals at AC the lats year he was there, and 24 the year before.

There's no doubt that he isn't playing the way he used to, but while legs can slow down they don't slow that much that fast without amputation!

To me it looks mostly confidence. He got through but instead of being confident enough to take the ball down calmly and go round Friedel, the ball got away and he shot straight at him.

We need Sheva and Pizzarro to have enough game time to get back in the groove. An early goal in a game that takes the pressure off could make a big difference.

Lets hope..

Nick

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Sheva is an excellent team player. Always was and still is. He does not have to leave the Premiership to be a player everybody wants him to be, but he has to leave Chelsea. We are not playing as a team. Every player plays for themselves, and most of our goals come from a player who did everything by himself and created that chance himself. Wonder why Lampard scores so many goals? Wonder why he is the best scoring midfielder? Well, that's a big part. Sheva cannot play that way. He is great, but not individualy. Great team player. Always liked him, and still do, but he won't help us, nor will Chelsea help him. It would be the best he leaves, for us and him.

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[Liam

He can't have lost his legs in 2-3 months. He scored, what was it 17 goals at AC the lats year he was there, and 24 the year before.

There's no doubt that he isn't playing the way he used to, but while legs can slow down they don't slow that much that fast without amputation!

I can't explain it either Nick, it's happened incredibly quickly, but it has definitely happened.

Watch him try to run past defenders - it's like he's been slightly slowed down while the others are at normal pace.

Jack is right. He'll have to adapt if he's to be effective going forward.

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There's no doubt that he isn't playing the way he used to, but while legs can slow down they don't slow that much that fast without amputation!

Nick, I played football for a very long time with a close friend. A long time ago we both got to play for a bit at a reasonable level. My mate played all his life at right back. Thing was, he was never what I would term a good footballer. Technically he really was quite poor. But boy, was he an athlete. Strong, stamina,(regularly ran half-marathons), 110% concentration and comittment every game. He was also the best man-marker I ever saw at our level. But his over-riding asset was his pace. He was rapid with a capital R. G4 would probably say I am describing Ashley Cole here. And, yes, they were very similar players. However, when my friend reached 31ish his pace disappeared. Literally, or so it appeared at the time, in the space of a few weeks. He just couldn't accelerate anymore. The legs wouldn't do it. He is actually still playing local Saturday afternoon reserve team football at the ripe old age of 47. Fair play to him. But he was never, ever the same player or played at as high a level after he lost that yard of speed. Age catches up with everyone. Some sooner than others. And the effects can be immediate.

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I'm going to take this topic in a different direction now.

It's probably apt to assume that Shevchenko may play against Rosenborg, given that Drogba will probably be rested for the BIG game against Man U.

Let's assume he scores a goal.

What will you say? Will you say that "oh, the Rosenborg defenders are low-class, scoring past them is no big achievement."

I feel Shevchenko probably will score if he is played.

Against Italy we saw his goal, which was rather opportunistic but still a goal. He probably needs to use that strength which is being in the right place at the right time, and not his pace which as some posters have mentioned before seems to be ebbing.

If Shevchenko scores it will be a great morale booster for everyone. But I fear, against my hopes, that it will be the same story of last season.

I bring you back to the famous goal against Tottenham in the FA Cup on the edge of the penalty area.

Remember the commentator's words?

"What a way to prove the critics wrong and his manager, who a few weeks ago was clearly unhappy with him."

Even if he scores, at the end of the season they will still look back at a disappointing season.

Anyway, if you remember Drogba's first season and subsequent seasons, I'll keep hoping Shevchenko can emulate Drogba's change of form.

Just because he failed to score in his first game means absolutely nothing. Dirk Kuyt has yet to open scoring for Liverpool despite four (almost) full games, and last season's second top scorer Ronaldo hasn't scored yet.

Neither has Andy Johnson, Carlos Tevez, Mark Viduka, John Carew, and a few other examples.

Wait for another game, and make judgement then.

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