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Revealing Scolari interview


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Ok, I read it very quickly, but am I right in understanding that he gave this interview before he was sacked?

If so, the man must have known he was on his way out, as to be so open and detailed about the short-comings of your squad would be utterly stupid otherwise.

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Ok, I read it very quickly, but am I right in understanding that he gave this interview before he was sacked?

If so, the man must have known he was on his way out, as to be so open and detailed about the short-comings of your squad would be utterly stupid otherwise.

I'm going with stupid. This is Scolari making excuses, addingf to the excuses made by his agent, which in turn followed the excuses made by supporters, the press, pundits and so on.

Know what? I am seriously glad to see the back of this clown.

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As many of us have said before, there is a fair deal of luck involved in football management and it seems Scolari had his early season and now he’s been found out. Lucky though that he goes away with a few quid burning a big hole in his pocket.

I do agree with him though about us not having any creative players in the team. We’ve all known that for ages. Bar Joey (and he’s been off his best form for a while) we have pretty much zilch in the creative department and it’s easy to see why he was so desperate to sign Robinho. So that said, why didn’t he give Stoch or Kakuta a try – if not in league matches at least in the cup?

I have some sympathy with Scolari as the squad he inherited is a squad in decline or certainly one that seems to be lacking motivation wise, but on the other hand he really didn’t try to change things – especially his insistence in carrying on with the negative tactic of playing Mikel as the defensive midfielder.

It’s gonna be very interesting to see how differently the same set of players performs under Hiddink.

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There is nothing overly controversial in what he has said but it is surprising that he would give that interview whilst still employed by the club. What it does emphasise though is his inability to get the best out of the players he did have. I don't buy the argument that he had an impossible job. It is only 7 months ago we were competing in the CL final.

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Essentially the interview just adds credence to the belief that he simply is not tactically astute enough to manage at the highest club level.

He bangs on about not having the players for the system...so, don't continue to play that sodding system. Clearly, as ethical has said, we have a decent enough squad of players, but it is certainly not a squad capable of playing sexy Brazilian football. Maybe Scolari only accepted the job because he thought he would be given the funds and players to bring his brand of football to the Bridge, but once this was obviously not going to happen, it seems that he really just didn't know what to do.

The Malouda bit is just bizarre. if he was not playing well, drop him! It's not exactly rocket science.

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I do not understand why we don't play well. Sometimes it's a problem with the players' positioning on the pitch. Sometimes we give the ball away too often. There are also individual mistakes. The injuries also make things hard. When you add all these things together, the situation is very complicated.

Players generally go where they're told to. Anelka played out wide because Scolari told him to. Giving the ball away you can put down to players confidence. This is a team that were very comfortable on the ball. Similarly with individual mistakes. It's the managers job to instill confidence. Blaming injuries is just an excuse - there've always been injuries, always will be.

We don't have time to work tactically, because there are so many matches in this country. We work on very specific things with the defence and the attack – especially set pieces. But the midfield requires a lot more time. We only have 15 minutes here, 10 minutes there to work on that and it is not enough. Unfortunately, the midfielders don't work a lot.

He complains about not having time with the players, and yet holds"full-scale, 11-a-side matches in training" which, as stated in the article, is virtually unheard of in English football, and so must have come as something a shock to the players. No wonder they were questioning his trainign methods. Specific things with defence? We all know how that worked out, don't we. As for attack, there was the repeated failure to create any meaningful chances.

As I've been saying, one of Scolari's major failings was that he persisted in attempting to mould the players to suit his preffered system, rather than adapting the system to suit the players available. And that is bad management, nothing more nothing less.

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so scolari says he couldn't get a squad packed full of internationals to work...why would anyone be stupid enough to hire him after saying something like that...sure we lacked creativity and losing out on signing robinho was a blow to his plans, but FFS...it's like the moment that happened he gave up and didn't figure out a way to make what he did have, work...people talks about players being mercenaries, but he now just looks like he didn't care about being a success at chelsea, just worrying about getting his full compensation

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so scolari says he couldn't get a squad packed full of internationals to work...why would anyone be stupid enough to hire him after saying something like that...sure we lacked creativity and losing out on signing robinho was a blow to his plans, but FFS...it's like the moment that happened he gave up and didn't figure out a way to make what he did have, work...people talks about players being mercenaries, but he now just looks like he didn't care about being a success at chelsea, just worrying about getting his full compensation

From training methods under Jose and Clarke being so maticulous, to a just having a kick about in training, it does make you wonder what international player thought of it all, it all sounds a bit school-boy to me.

What they worked on in training did materialise itself to the pitch though, especially the lack of preparation on defending and attacking set-pieces. Leaving the last game v Hull my brother commented 'that it's like watching 11 stranger's, they must go into training and just have a kick about' - how true he was!!

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Reading that just makes me angry really - on three counts:

1 - He is making up excuses for his own failings (the Malouda comments are outrageous)

2 - He was employed in the first place

3 - It took as long as it did for the club to get rid.

Maybe point three is harsh. We had seen for months things were not right and the players were not right. Why hadnt anyone at the club ?

Either way anyone who was upset at the sacking of 'Big Phil' should have a change of opinion after reading that.

We need to move on from this very frustrating period in our recent history.

Onwards and upwards! A win tommorow will start. Certainly im a lot more confident about a match away to Watford than i was on Sunday.

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Reading that just makes me angry really - on three counts:

1 - He is making up excuses for his own failings (the Malouda comments are outrageous)

2 - He was employed in the first place

3 - It took as long as it did for the club to get rid.

Maybe point three is harsh. We had seen for months things were not right and the players were not right. Why hadnt anyone at the club ?

Either way anyone who was upset at the sacking of 'Big Phil' should have a change of opinion after reading that.

We need to move on from this very frustrating period in our recent history.

Onwards and upwards! A win tommorow will start. Certainly im a lot more confident about a match away to Watford than i was on Sunday.

I've said a few time Barry Fry could have won the world cup with the Brazil squad Fil did.

It turns out we ended up the Brazilian Barry Fry.

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Jesus christ, that certainly was something. Halfway through I was reading that with my eyes peeking past my fingers. I know hindsight is 20/20, but seeing this, he was just not right for this job at all

I think Tim hit he nail on the head. He doesnt have the players, and he mustve thought he was getting that when he signed in July. But if his plan to remedy this situation was buying Robinho and leaving it at that, pardon me for voicing my doubts. England is a physical league, and Robinho is a waif. What if he got his leg broken in the preseason. It seems like he was gambling with all the house's money on getting one player. That, or he was really just in the dark about the actual skill level of the squad.

He talks about lack of relationship with the squad. Scolari's english is poor at best. What does he really expect? I know Jose is an exceptional character, but it says alot that he immerses himself in a new language before a job and learns it well before day 1.

Also, I am not a coach and probably never will be, but if the players are in training during the week, how is there not enough time to work on things? And why the need for full scale practice matches? These players have been playing competitive football since age 10, probably. I understand constructing a situation that matches the enviroment of a game, but i think they would be able to translate what they learn in a static situation on to a full scale match. I guess that might explain why we kept conceeding from corners, though.

I have to ask who at the club thought Scolari would be a good hire for this club, and how much did they really know about him before this decision was made?

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The interview is pretty damning, showing his tactical limitations and antiquated, ineffective approach to training, which is where the best managers really shine, by working on specific situations and experimenting with different tactics. That was how Jose revolutionised the club and took us to a new level, and the players really responded to his phenomenal attention to detail. Remember how he planned meticulously for EVERY opposition - individuals as well as the tactics they were likely to employ.

You get the impression that Scolari just didn't do that. At all. Which showed up in our shocking defensive organisation and the lack of variety in our tactics and formations.

You also get the impression that he had no idea how to develop the creative side of our game. That was supposed to be done by Robinho, not the manager, and when he never came he was stumped.

Interesting that this interview was given to a French publication. They'd have taken great delight in detonating this one at just the right time to cause havoc at the club (as if we weren't in enough chaos anyway). I don't suppose he was aware of the recent troubles the club has had with French players sounding off to French journos, but to make comments like that about the team while still the manager shows astonishing naivety for a man of his experience

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The interview is pretty damning, showing his tactical limitations and antiquated, ineffective approach to training, which is where the best managers really shine, by working on specific situations and experimenting with different tactics. That was how Jose revolutionised the club and took us to a new level, and the players really responded to his phenomenal attention to detail. Remember how he planned meticulously for EVERY opposition - individuals as well as the tactics they were likely to employ.

You get the impression that Scolari just didn't do that. At all. Which showed up in our shocking defensive organisation and the lack of variety in our tactics and formations.

You also get the impression that he had no idea how to develop the creative side of our game. That was supposed to be done by Robinho, not the manager, and when he never came he was stumped.

Interesting that this interview was given to a French publication. They'd have taken great delight in detonating this one at just the right time to cause havoc at the club (as if we weren't in enough chaos anyway). I don't suppose he was aware of the recent troubles the club has had with French players sounding off to French journos, but to make comments like that about the team while still the manager shows astonishing naivety for a man of his experience

Excellent post and I agree with your conclusions. :wub:

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I think Scolari is quite humane and humble person. I think he means what he says. The biggest problem ended out being the language barrier although he would not admit it..

No, the biggest problem was his incompetence. I don't think Scolari's English is much worse than say, Capello's.

He was just completely out of his depth for the job he was given and the team ultimately paid the price for it.

Whether he is a humble person or a classless prick is totally irrelevant. I'd rather have an asshole who gets things done than a nice guy who is clueless.

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No, the biggest problem was his incompetence. I don't think Scolari's English is much worse than say, Capello's.

And much better than Claudio's, for instance, when he took over at the Bridge - Claudio's English wasn't that much better when he left! I agree, blaming Scolari's poor command of the English language is just one more excuse. Personally I'm a little bemused at the lengths people are prepared to go to to make excuses for him. I could understand it up to a point while he was still Chelsea manager, but now he's gone, face it - he was never up to the job. His only success was in his initial dealings with the media. And that didn't last long either.

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http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/sport/foo...icle5734162.ece

Cudicini appears to share such views with some of his erstwhile teammates. The Italian goalkeeper, who was allowed to join Tottenham on a free transfer three weeks ago as a reward for his long, loyal service, said: “It just didn’t work out. I didn’t say he was the wrong man the d a y h e w a s a p p o i n t e d because I didn’t know him then but now I know he was a mistake. He had been an international coach, not a club manager, for too long. He wasn’t used to the daily involvement with players and the daily training and organisation of things.

“It was a different culture for him, too. English football is totally different to what he knew and he found it difficult to adapt to the style and speed of the game. He was a very nice guy but not the right person.†Contrasting Scolari with Jose Mourinho, who won two Premier League titles with Chelsea, Cudicini said: “Jose adapted very well to English football straighta-way. As soon as he arrived he seemed to know the players and what was required - the mentality, the way to train, everything. Scolari just didn’t have the same impact.â€

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