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Do you have a "soft spot" for any other teams?


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Alright, so I want to start this off by saying from the very start of loving football, I have loved and will only love one club and that is the Blues of Chelsea. As you can probably tell, I do live in the States. I was able to see Chelsea for the first time in person in St Louis this past month. Yes it was just a friendly, but for me it was an amazing experience that really cemented my love for Chelsea and truly was the experience that made me realize I am Chelsea Till I Die.

 

That said, I also found to respect the fans and club of Manchester City. The fans were great to hang out with unlike the counterparts of Arsenal, ManU, Spurs, Pool, etc fans that I know when it comes to talking football. The arrogance isn't there, in fact most City fans in the States that I met knew their stuff and most, I would say 4 out of 5, were all fans before the money and didn't just say it. You could tell it in their heart that they loved their club.

 

All this rambling just to say, I do have a soft spot for City now. I will never, ever, EVER choose City over Chelsea. When Chelsea play them I want us to crush them. I want Chelsea to beat them in the transfer market. If Chelsea need City to lose to stay ahead in points for the title or other significant places then I am rooting against City, but after meeting there fans and all the extra work the club is putting in to winning the American market, I do have a slight soft spot for them and I will hope they beat the likes of Arsenal, Pool, Spurs, ManU, as long as Chelsea is unaffected. I'm sure it's been asked before, but do you have a soft spot for any other teams?

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I have a soft spot for Valencia (he says wearing a Valencia training vest), but other than that, not really. I have certain preferences in other leagues, like I prefer Real to Barcelona, I prefer AC Milan to Inter, Porto to Benfica, Lyon to PSG, Ajax to PSV, etc. I don't really care about those teams, I'd just rather see them win than their opposition.

 

Chelsea always take precedence and always will. They are my club. I like Valencia enough to watch most of their games when they're on Sky and like to see them do well, but nothing really beyond that.

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Deportivo La Coruna. Not sure why. I think it was because i thought Diego Tristan was awesome. I was around 7 at the time.

 

Deportivo for me as well.

 

Just as I usually go for the underdog in every match I watch, I have a preference for pretty much every league I follow. It makes watching the leagues more interesting. In England, the teams I don't hate are Newcastle and Everton. In the other leagues, Deportivo in Spain, Feyenoord in Holland, Napoli in Italy, Dortmund in Germany...

 

Of course, there is no feelings, it just makes watching the leagues more interesting.

Edited by BlueBosnian
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Alright, so I want to start this off by saying from the very start of loving football, I have loved and will only love one club and that is the Blues of Chelsea. As you can probably tell, I do live in the States. I was able to see Chelsea for the first time in person in St Louis this past month. Yes it was just a friendly, but for me it was an amazing experience that really cemented my love for Chelsea and truly was the experience that made me realize I am Chelsea Till I Die.

 

That said, I also found to respect the fans and club of Manchester City. The fans were great to hang out with unlike the counterparts of Arsenal, ManU, Spurs, Pool, etc fans that I know when it comes to talking football. The arrogance isn't there, in fact most City fans in the States that I met knew their stuff and most, I would say 4 out of 5, were all fans before the money and didn't just say it. You could tell it in their heart that they loved their club.

 

All this rambling just to say, I do have a soft spot for City now. I will never, ever, EVER choose City over Chelsea. When Chelsea play them I want us to crush them. I want Chelsea to beat them in the transfer market. If Chelsea need City to lose to stay ahead in points for the title or other significant places then I am rooting against City, but after meeting there fans and all the extra work the club is putting in to winning the American market, I do have a slight soft spot for them and I will hope they beat the likes of Arsenal, Pool, Spurs, ManU, as long as Chelsea is unaffected. I'm sure it's been asked before, but do you have a soft spot for any other teams?

 

Quite a bit on this topic in an old thread: http://www.theshedend.com/topic/21839-can-you-be-loyal-to-more-than-one-team/?hl=%2Bsoft+%2Bspot

 

 

Personally, I’ve always followed Chelsea because my Dad grew up a Chelsea supporter, and I’ve had the influence since I can remember.

But that said, having lived away from London for most of my life [half overseas and half in Scotland], and having a South-American family connection, I’ll always have a soft spot for a few other teams. ‘The Strongest’ is the team most of my family support in Bolivia, and I’ve been to a several important games, so will always care about them. Also, more close to home, Aberdeen as I lived there first, and used to go and watch them play when I was a nipper, and Rangers because I lived in Glasgow until a few months ago for about 5 years; and it goes without saying there is a very established link between Chelsea and Rangers. Whenever I watch Chelsea its usually with a group of friends who are split 50/50 between the 2 clubs, many season ticket holders at Ibrox as well as Stamford Bridge, and I’ll gladly sing along with the Rangers songs. But, I can’t completely discount Aberdeen as I’ll always want them to do well. It’s a conflicting mind-set, I know, as they are bitter rivals but that’s just the point, they are ‘soft-spots’ so the conflict doesn’t really matter to me. They don’t come near to the connection I have with Chelsea.

 

If anything, living away from London for so long and now coming back, hasn’t meant I formed a loyal bond to another team, but actually cemented my love for Chelsea. I think it’s because I had to stick up for myself in every school/club/university/friendship group I was ever a part of for being a Chelsea supporter. Most people in Aberdeen/Glasgow/Asia/USA that I came across supported United, Arsenal or Liverpool, or at least had an open distain for Chelsea. It was almost like being at an away game every single time we played a match – win or lose, watching the match with mates, or going into school/Uni the next day, was always either the most brilliant or most harrowing experience imaginable!

 

In your case, with Man City, though I think having a respect for a team’s fans is absolutely fine, -many of my friends who made it to Munich say only good things about their fans- actually having a ‘soft-spot’ for a team that competes in the same league is a different story. There are many teams who’s fans I respect more than others but I wouldn’t dream of saying I had a ‘soft-spot’ for them; it’s a line I definitely wouldn’t be able to cross..

 

..so in conclusion, yes I have a couple of ‘soft spots’ for a few other clubs around the world, but none are in direct conflict with Chelsea, and nothing will be even comparable to the love I have for Chelsea. 

Edited by Jones1905
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AC Milan.

 

I used to watch their games on channel 4 when they used to show "Football Italia" and my favourite player was a certain Shevchenko but also always admired Maldini as well. 

 

I did the San Siro stadium tour when I went to Milan recently and loved seeing it in real life.

 

They were also our first opponents in the Champions League as well and not forgetting they loan use George Weah who on his debut off the bench got the equaliser against Spurs to rescue our unbeaten record against them. 

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Shrewsbury Town - it's now my local team and I go along a few times a season and cheer them on avidly when I do - though not as passionately as I do Chelsea of course.  Was disproportionately pleased that "Come on you Blues" did for both - not sure if I could have coped with "reds"!  Queued from about 3 in the morning for tickets when they were drawn at home against Chelsea in the FA cup a few years back but unfortunately were still quite a way down the road when they sold out.  

 

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Like Eggy, one of my main soft spot clubs is Valencia. I've loved the way have managed to ride out financial peril the last 10 years while remaining competitive and developing/producing some great players. Aimar, Villa, Silva, Mata, Albiol, now Banega, Piatti and Soldado. Also, I thought they would be "delivered' from their financial mess by that Inversiones Dalport mess, but that turned out to be a bad joke. I suppose I also like them because they (along with Atl Madrid) seem like the only credible resistance to the duopoly in Spain.

 

In England there are a small subset of clubs I like to see do well, based on personal connections. Forest is the main one, but Wednesday and Northampton Town I also look out for. I suppose that would come to an end if any of them become regular premier league clubs. Among top level sides, I dont mind seeing Villa and Everton do well, as long as it isnt at our expense. 

 

In France I used to have a eye for PSG eversince I got one of their lovely kits as a youngster, but when they become the big bad boy in France that died off. 

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I support two clubs, my local Australian team (Brisbane), and the first team I ever supported when living in England (Chelsea).

 

Beyond that I don't care. I just hate some of the other teams more than others, and the rest... I nothing, unless they are playing one of the hated teams, then I'll silently, and temporarily cheer them on.

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Usually jump in and out, the latest being Watford due to obvious reasons, I've always fancied myself to be lyon supporter for strange reasons. They're kinda sh*t right now and there's really not many players in their squad I actually dig but I like the club, this shall change in a couple months anyways lmao.

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It's not a matter of having second teams smh. I only support Chelsea and well JK Rakvere Tarvas who are my home club but they play in the Estonian second division so noone here gives a sh*t about it. It's just a matter of which club seem more symphatetic then others. Doesn't mean I'm going to pull on their jersey, there's only one colour for that and it is blue bruh.

Edited by Soulo
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My Dad is a Middlesbrough fan (he wouldn't let me support them as a boy- telling me I had to support a London team and my two best friends as a 6 year old were Chelsea fans). I have been to quite a few Middlesbrough games including Europa League quaters/semis, FA Cup semis and their 2003 LC win. I had a Middlesbrough shirt when I was 12 and a few memorabilia.  However, I have no emotional attachment to these games or the club, the only emotional attachment I have is my Dad's happiness. I keep up to date with them, know the players, the history and will watch their games/highlights on sky/BBC. I can't celebrate a goal though, you know with that genuine passion a goal should be celebrated with. I follow Middlesbrough, but in no way do I have any feelings of support towards them.

I have a soft spot for Man City as well. My mum's side of the family are from Manchester, but are all United fans. However, the in-laws are City fans. Growing up they got so much flack when they were in division 2 and United were winning the treble. I just find it hilarious now with what's happened up there and know how much City fans must be loving it, despite last season. When I was growing up my cousins were going to Gillingham away, and just other 10 years later they're snatching the title off united 10 years later. Incredible stuff. Don't follow them like the Boro, but I do just find it hilarious what is happening.

But you can't support two teams. That's just impossible.

Edit: I wear other teams shirts though, and don't really give a monkey's what people think. Been collecting second hand football shirts in African markets and have some pretty good ones all under £2.

Edited by mactheknife
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Feeling you 100%, didn't mean u can't wear other jerseys, i was more making a point to the post beforehand. And personally i am on the same lane about city getting their hayday after all the sh*t they've gotten from utd fans over the years.

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Haha wasn't responding to that. It' just I get some flack from mates, but I know I'm a Chelsea fan, so I feel more than comfortable in another team's shirt. The other teams shirts I wear, I only wear when playing football. OK I'm 21, but it still makes me feel like a player from that era of a team when I play football in the park or training. For example, I have a 1997 Boro shirt and I feel like Juninho when I play and I have a 1988 Man U shirt and when I wear that I feel like Bryan Robson. Sad I know, but It's how I get my kicks now I don't have a girlfriend. Considering these shirts cost me between £1-£2 a pop, it would have been rude for me not to buy them. I also have a 1991/92 Chelsea shirt, picked up for £1. I always feel like Wisey in that one.
 

Anybody who says they support two teams from the same league/country, support none. I have found from my experience of witnessing some of the greatest nights in a Middlesbrough's history, nothing we will bring me near to the feeling Chelsea give me.
 

Though I would if somebody felt differently to say as it is an interesting point of discussion.

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Athletic Club in Spain, I'm a big admirer of their unique cantera policy and the fact that they will never scrap it for the sake of success, they'd quite literally prefer to get relegated than see their cultural identity sold down the river. They've also played some great football over recent years under Bielsa, who has to be one of the most eccentric managers around.

 

They have historically had an 'English' mentality stretching back to the days of 'el mister', Fred Pentland, and with Bilbao being a port city, the clubs roots were sewn by the influence of British sailors.

 

 

Fred Pentland was your typical eccentric English gentleman; complete with a bowler hat and large cigar. Certainly not a person you would imagine is responsible for the beginning of Spain’s glorious footballing philosophy. Before making his name in the country, Pentland had already coached both Germany and France to the Olympics as hard as that is to believe nowadays. Back then however, many British coaches went abroad to achieve great success. In truth, there were very few opportunities back home to implement different styles and tactics in football.

 

England was rooted and stubborn. Their way or nothing. He joined Racing Santander in 1920 and, after only one year, he was snapped up by Basque giants Athletic Club. Pentland truly announced himself in Bilbao, becoming one of the most forward-thinking coaches ever to grace the game. The man known as ‘el mister’ to his players, a term still used for any La Liga coach today, revolutionised the famous club. He also put his own stamp on the side; from the way they played the game, to making sure his players tied their boot laces correctly.

 

Fred Pentland finally left Spain in 1934 because of civil unrest that preceded the breakout of the Spanish Civil War, during which the football league was cancelled.  After the Civil War and under the dictatorship of General Franco Spain, of course, was largely closed to foreigners and it was not until 1959 that Fred was able to return to Bilbao and San Mamas.  This was when he was invited by Athletic Club Bilbao to attend a friendly match against Chelsea FC.

 

 

“Freddie†Pentland is revered in the club’s history, although it’s hard to decide whether that is due to his inspired management or because he embodied to perfection the idea of the eccentric English gentleman. He was known as bombín (bowler hat) and photo­graphs suggest he was not so much eccentric as barking mad. Pentland’s first act at Athletic was to show the players how to tie their bootlaces correctly – “get the simple things right and the rest will follow†was apparently his motto. Pentland smoked big cigars and wore his bowler, even in training, but his contribution to Spanish football is not to be scoffed at. He is remembered above all as an advocate of the short-passing game, as opposed to the cruder style still embarrassingly referred to in Spain as “the old 1-2-3â€.

 

Barcelona, halfway through the first league cam­paign of 1928-29, decided to adopt lo de Pentland (Pentland’s way), and won the title with it. Their stature in the game from 1928 onwards inevitably influenced others in adopting the “ball into feet†approach. That this system was associated with an Englishman seems something of an irony, and truth to tell it was more likely that Pentland had left England precisely because of his reluctance to play under the auspices of the big hoof. In 1923 Athletic won the cup playing the possession game but, after two trophyless years, opened a debate over which system should be adopted. Pent­land, perhaps sensing problems, moved on to Oviedo.

When he returned to Athletic in 1929, his dedication to the passing game paid off more handsomely, and the Basques won the league in 1930 and 1931. In the latter season they pummelled Barcelona by the extraordinary score of 12-1, a result which remains the Catalans’ worst defeat. In Pentland’s last season in Bilbao, 1932-33, Athletic finished runners-up to Real Madrid and had clearly assimilated the notion that a more patient game, so characteristic of modern Spanish football, was the way forward.

 

During his time in Spain he was known as El Bombín due to the bowler hats which he wore, and if the team won, was stamped on and destroyed by the players. His time at the club is greatly remembered and he was invited over to Bilbao in 1959 for a homenaje (testimonial) against Chelsea and awarded a Distinguished Members medal. Following his death in 1962 the club held a memorial which included an aurresku – a traditional Basque dance reserved for only a select few

 

FrederickBeaconsfieldPentland2-e13376754

 

They're known as the Lions, as well, so a nice wee Chelsea similarity there!

 

North of the border I'm an admirer of Celtic for family reasons, the first British club (and indeed, the first Northern European club) to lift the European Cup, and a storied domestic history to boot.

 

Over recent years I've become rather enamoured with Borussia Dortmund, (and that's years, not months, you Johnny come lately Champions League bandwagoners! :biggrin: ) their stadium is immense and their manager is a true eccentric, they're the upstarts competing against the established order in the form of Bayern Munchen.

 

The fact that their greatest rivals, Schalke, are essentially the 'Liverpool' of Germany, a once mighty club trading on past glories and comically tripping up at every turn when they get within a whisker of silverware, also helps.

 

Aside from those three I merely have preferences, Feyenoord in Holland, River Plate in Argentina, Cagliari in Italy, Hajduk in Croatia, Odense in Denmark, etc, teams that I like but wouldn't claim to love.

Edited by Lofty 1905
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I only like Chelsea really. But I will often root for the under dogs in games, or teams that come back. An example being I rooted for Madrid in their second leg against Dortmund, but that was probably down to Jose as well.

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Brisbane Roar is my local team in Australia and I often go to their games (they're pretty cheap too, only about 10 pounds a ticket).

I used to live quite near Watford and Luton so i'd prefer them over other teams in their division although I don't really follow them much, except I did watch the playoff final and also watched the FA Cup game between Luton and Milwall.

And I prefer RM to Barca, again I rarely watch their games but I just f**king hate Barca.

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Athletic Club in Spain, I'm a big admirer of their unique cantera policy and the fact that they will never scrap it for the sake of success, they'd quite literally prefer to get relegated than see their cultural identity sold down the river. They've also played some great football over recent years under Bielsa, who has to be one of the most eccentric managers around.

They have historically had an 'English' mentality stretching back to the days of 'el mister', Fred Pentland, and with Bilbao being a port city, the clubs roots were sewn by the influence of British sailors.

FrederickBeaconsfieldPentland2-e13376754

They're known as the Lions, as well, so a nice wee Chelsea similarity there!

North of the border I'm an admirer of Celtic for family reasons, the first British club (and indeed, the first Northern European club) to lift the European Cup, and a storied domestic history to boot.

Over recent years I've become rather enamoured with Borussia Dortmund, (and that's years, not months, you Johnny come lately Champions League bandwagoners! :biggrin: ) their stadium is immense and their manager is a true eccentric, they're the upstarts competing against the established order in the form of Bayern Munchen.

The fact that their greatest rivals, Schalke, are essentially the 'Liverpool' of Germany, a once mighty club trading on past glories and comically tripping up at every turn when they get within a whisker of silverware, also helps.

Aside from those three I merely have preferences, Feyenoord in Holland, River Plate in Argentina, Cagliari in Italy, Hajduk in Croatia, Odense in Denmark, etc, teams that I like but wouldn't claim to love.

Very interesting post Lofty. It opened up an aspect of football that I had no idea existed, tbh.Thanks for posting.

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It was very common in that era for English coaches to hop over to Spain and manage, aside from Pentland Athletic was coached by a 'Mr. Shepherd' when they were founded, and also employed Billy Barnes, a 'Mr. Burton', and William Garbutt (more famous on Italian shores at Genoa, Roma and Napoli) before the outbreak of the Civil War.

 

Real Madrid had Arthur Johnson and Robert Firth, Barcelona had Jack Greenwell, Ralph Kirby, James Bellamy and Irishman Patrick O'Connell, I could go on with other clubs but the names are far too numerous to mention.

 

It's quite ironic given the way the English school is viewed on the continent nowadays, but when you think about the origins of Association Football it's quite logical that British player-turned-coaches were pivotal in the spread of the game abroad.

 

Here in New Zealand our first full time coach/manager was former Chelsea stalwart Ken Armstrong, before he arrived our national team was merely decided by committee!

 

aaaa.jpg

 

Mr Pentland immortalised in the form of a statue, I think we'll have something similar here for Jose one day.

Edited by Lofty 1905
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I've always had a soft spot Real Madrid, love the history and the players they've produced over the years (Di Stefano, Puskas, etc.) Aside from that I do like certain teams from each of the leagues - PSV from the Netherlands, Fiorentina from Italy, Stuttgart from Germany, Marseille from France and so on. I'll support them against whatever other teams they verse, but obviously they're all second to Chelsea.

 

Also, due to my Serbian background, I've been a fan of Partizan Belgrade from a young age and still follow them, though they're very rarely in the UCL.

Edited by Teritus
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